INTERPRETATIONS OF ASIA
Cover: Shanghai Modern: The Flowering of a New Urban Culture in China, 1930–1945, from Harvard University PressCover: Shanghai Modern in PAPERBACK

Shanghai Modern

The Flowering of a New Urban Culture in China, 1930–1945

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$40.00 • £32.95 • €36.00

ISBN 9780674805514

Publication Date: 09/01/1999

Short

464 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

26 halftones

Harvard East Asian Series > Interpretations of Asia

World

In the midst of China’s wild rush to modernize, a surprising note of reality arises: Shanghai, it seems, was once modern indeed, a pulsing center of commerce and art in the heart of the twentieth century. This book immerses us in the golden age of Shanghai urban culture, a modernity at once intrinsically Chinese and profoundly anomalous, blending new and indigenous ideas with those flooding into this “treaty port” from the Western world.

A preeminent specialist in Chinese studies, Leo Ou-fan Lee gives us a rare wide-angle view of Shanghai culture in the making. He shows us the architecture and urban spaces in which the new commercial culture flourished, then guides us through the publishing and filmmaking industries that nurtured a whole generation of artists and established a bold new style in urban life known as modeng. In the work of six writers of the time, particularly Shi Zhecun, Mu Shiying, and Eileen Chang, Lee discloses the reflection of Shanghai’s urban landscape—foreign and familiar, oppressive and seductive, traditional and innovative. This work acquires a broader historical and cosmopolitan context with a look at the cultural links between Shanghai and Hong Kong, a virtual genealogy of Chinese modernity from the 1930s to the present day.

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