THE JOHN HARVARD LIBRARY
Cover: The Spirit of the Ghetto, from Harvard University PressCover: The Spirit of the Ghetto in PAPERBACK

The Spirit of the Ghetto

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$39.00 • £31.95 • €35.00

ISBN 9780674832664

Publication Date: 01/01/1967

Short

315 pages

illustrated

Belknap Press

The John Harvard Library

World

  • Introduction by Moses Rischin
  • Note on the Text
  • List of Illustrations*
  • The Spirit of the Ghetto
    • Preface
    • 1. The Old and the New
      • The Old Man
      • The Boy
      • The “Intellectuals”
    • 2. Prophets without Honor
      • Submerged Scholars: A Man of God—A Bitter Prophet—A Calm Student
      • The Poor Rabbis: Their Grievances—The “Genuine” Article—A Down-Town Specimen—The Neglected Type
    • 3. The Old and New Woman
      • The Orthodox Jewess: Devotion and Customs
      • The Modern Type: Passionate Socialists—Confirmed Blue-Stockings
      • Place of Woman in Ghetto Literature
    • 4. Four Poets
      • A Wedding Bard
      • A Champion of Race
      • A Singer of Labor
      • A Dreamer of Brotherhood
    • 5. The Stage
      • Theatres, Actors, and Audience
      • Realism, the Spirit of the Ghetto Theatre
      • The History of the Yiddish Stage
    • 6. The Newspapers
      • The Conservative Journals
      • The Socialist Papers
      • The Anarchist Papers
      • Some Picturesque Contributors
    • 7. The Sketch-Writers
      • Some Realists
      • A Cultivated Literary Man
      • American Life Through Russian Eyes
      • A Satirist of Tenement Society
    • 8. A Novelist
    • 9. The Young Art and its Exponents
    • 10. Odd Characters
      • An Out-of-date Story-Writer
      • A Cynical Inventor
      • An Impassioned Critic
      • The Poet of Zionism
      • An Intellectual Debauchee
  • Notes
  • Index of Names
  • * Illustrations
    • [Tenement and Sweatshop]
    • The theatre presents a peculiarly picturesque sight.
    • [The Old Man]
    • [Garment Carrier]
    • [Sabbath Service]
    • [Meditation]
    • The Morning Prayer
    • Going to the Synagogue
    • The “Chaider”
    • Friday Night Prayer
    • In these cafes they meet after the theatre or an evening lecture.
    • He is unknown and unhonored.
    • Moses Reicherson
    • Rev. H. Rosenberg
    • “Submerged Scholars”
    • The “American” Rabbi
    • The rabbi can tell whether or not it is koshur.
    • Her life is absorbed in observing the religious law.
    • Intensely Serious
    • A Russian Girl-Student
    • Working Girls Returning Home
    • A Russian Type
    • Eliakim Zunser
    • Menahem Dolitzki
    • Morris Rosenfeld
    • Abraham Wald
    • Mr. Moshkovitz
    • Yiddish Playwrights Discussing the Drama
    • David Kessler
    • Jacob Adler
    • Jacob Gordin
    • Madame Liptzen
    • In the Office of The “Vorwarts”
    • Buying a Newspaper
    • A “Ghetto” Newspaper Office
    • S. Janowsky
    • Katz
    • A. Frumkin
    • A Type of Laboring Man
    • S. Libin
    • He is tired, distressed, and irritated.
    • He was bewitched by mathematics.
    • He leaves her with the cart and runs to the tenement-house.
    • A sweat-shop girl moves his fancy deeply.
    • Gitl
    • A Little Girl of Hester Street
    • The Push-Carts of Hester Street and Their Guard at Night
    • N. M. Shaikevitch
    • Naptali Herz Imber
    • A young man and a young woman just entered the cafe.
    • [Sunset]

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