Cover: Homer and the Heroic Tradition, from Harvard University PressCover: Homer and the Heroic Tradition in E-DITION

Homer and the Heroic Tradition

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Product Details

E-DITION

$65.00 • £54.95 • €60.00

ISBN 9780674862845

Publication Date: 01/01/1958

365 pages

1 Chart

World

Related Subjects

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In this century the findings of specialized studies in archaeology, linguistics, anthropology, and comparative oral poetry have radically changed the nature of Homeric scholarship.

This brilliant literary study of Homer’s poetry provides a new discussion consistent with adjacent accomplishments which demonstrates that the Iliad is a unity, not a pastiche—and that it belongs to the end of the eighth century. Further, Cedric Whitman dates the Odyssey as only a very little later.

While admitting the presence of some primitive material in these poems, the author shows that in the main they are examples of highly sophisticated art. Whitman emphasizes that the oral poet’s formula was not merely a convenient device for versifying without pen and ink, but a real artistic medium which, when developed to the point at which it appears in Homer, creates a language necessarily poetic and imagistic, capable of great variety and elaboration, and at times in itself almost a creative force. The author holds that there can be little question but that the Homeric epics were written down in the lifetime of the poet. Among the many contributions to Homeric research is Whitman’s “geometric design” of the Iliad, which tries to illustrate not only how the Iliad is constructed, but why it was constructed so—showing the central episode of Achilles’ wrath in the symmetrical mounting of the whole Trojan war.

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Jacket: How To Be Gay, by David M. Halperin, from Harvard University Press

Celebrating Pride Month, Part II

To celebrate Pride Month, we are highlighting excerpts from books that explore the lives and experiences of the LGBT+ community. This second excerpt comes from How To Be Gay, a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award, in which David M. Halperin, a pioneer of LGBTQ studies, dares to suggest that gayness is a way of being that gay men must learn from one another to become who they are.