Cover: Germany: Key to Peace, from Harvard University PressCover: Germany in E-DITION

Germany

Key to Peace

Available from De Gruyter »

Product Details

E-DITION

$65.00 • €60.00

ISBN 9780674865563

Publication Date: 01/01/1953

344 pages

World

Related Subjects

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  • Preface: A Matter of Credentials
  • 1. Why Germany Is the Key to Peace
  • 2. Four-Power Fiasco
    • 1. Germany under Potsdam in 1946
    • 2. Reasons for Failure
      • Pre-surrender Planning: “just peace,” unconditional surrender, the Morgenthau plan, JCS 1067, Yalta. Post-surrender Policy: Potsdam, two major blunders, three fallacies, the lost initiative.
    • 3. A Suggested Policy Revision (August, 1946)
      • Frontiers, unification, termination of occupation, revision of industry limitation and control, a European coal authority.
    • 4. Secretary Byrnes’s Attempt at Revision
    • 5. Anglo-American Difficulties
  • 3. Deadlock and Cold War (1947)
    • 1. Change in U.S. Management
    • 2. The Truman Doctrine
    • 3. The Moscow Conference
    • 4. Return to Reason (The Marshall Plan)
    • 5. Firsthand Reappraisal
    • 6. The Notion of a Separate Peace
    • 7. The London Conference
    • 8. Forecast and Review
  • 4. Partition and the Berlin Crisis (1948)
    • 1. East-West Deployment
    • 2. The “Devil Theory” Adopted
    • 3. Crisis in Germany
    • 4. The U.N. and the Berlin Crisis
    • 5. The Ruhr Agreement
    • 6. Year-end Evaluation
  • 5. Lost Chance for Change (First half 1949)
    • 1. Unsuccessful Warning
    • 2. The North Atlantic Security Program
    • 3. State Department Release of April 26
    • 4. The Treaty before the Senate
    • 5. Council of Foreign Ministers Conference
    • 6. The Military Aid Bill
  • 6. Two Germanys Are Born (Second half 1949)
    • 1. West Germany Elects a Government
    • 2. East Germany Votes “Ja!”
    • 3. The Petersberg Agreement
    • 4. The Rearmament Cat Let Out of the Bag
    • 5. Year-end Evaluation
  • 7. Military Cart before Political Horse (1950)
    • 1. How to Defend West Germany?
    • 2. The Schuman Plan Lets in Light
    • 3. Washington Wrecks the Hope
    • 4. Soviet Warning and Counter-proposal
    • 5. Elections in West Germany
    • 6. “Reexamination” Declined
    • 7. The Brussels Conference
    • 8. Appraisal of 1950
  • 8. Slow Motion (1951)
    • 1. Eisenhower Calls a Halt
    • 2. “Troops for Europe”
    • 3. The Schuman Plan Compromised
    • 4. Dealings with Russia
    • 5. The Deputies at Paris
    • 6. The “European Army”
    • 7. An “Iffy” Proposal
    • 8. West German “Democracy”
    • 9. Appeal to the United Nations
  • 9. The Power of Decision Is Lost (First half 1952)
    • 1. Crisis within NATO
    • 2. London and Lisbon
    • 3. New Soviet Approach to an All-German Settlement
    • 4. The Mutual Security Act
    • 5. The Die Is Cast
    • 6. Pig in a Poke
    • 7. The Truman-Acheson Books Are Closed
  • 10. Europe Revolts While the U.S. Elects (Second half 1952)
    • 1. The Presidential Campaign
    • 2. The Revolt in Europe
      • Events in Britain, the European community, stalling with Russia, events in Germany and France, slow-down strike.
    • 3. The Interregnum
  • 11. Retrospect and a Look into the Future
    • 1. Landmarks of Failure
    • 2. A Program Submitted
    • 3. Reactions to the Proposal
    • 4. Events and Indications of 1953
    • 5. A Word about Over-all Policy
  • Bibliography
  • Index

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