Cover: Theories and Things in PAPERBACK

Theories and Things

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$37.50 • £30.95 • €34.00

ISBN 9780674879263

Publication Date: 01/01/1986

Short

216 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

Belknap Press

World

Here are the most recent writings, some of them unpublished, of the preeminent philosopher of our time. Philosophical reflections on language are brought to bear upon metaphysical and epistemological questions such as these: What does it mean to assume objects, concrete and abstract? How do such assumptions serve science? What is the empirical content of a scientific theory? Further essays deal with meaning, moral values, analytical philosophy and its history, metaphor, the nature of mathematics; several are concerned with logic; and there are essays on individual philosophers. The volume concludes with some general reflections on the contemporary scene and two playful pieces on the Times Atlas and H. L. Mencken.

W. V. Quine is always, whatever his subject, an elegant writer, witty, precise, and forceful. Admirers of his earlier books will welcome this new volume.

Awards & Accolades

  • W. V. Quine Is Winner of the 1996 Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy
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