Cover: Three Centuries of Harvard, 1636–1936, from Harvard University PressCover: Three Centuries of Harvard, 1636–1936 in PAPERBACK

Three Centuries of Harvard, 1636–1936

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$42.00 • £33.95 • €38.00

ISBN 9780674888913

Publication Date: 10/15/1986

Short

520 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

1 illustration

Belknap Press

World

  • The Puritan Age, 1636–1707
    • 1. ‘First Flowers of Their Wilderness’
    • 2. School of The Prophets
    • 3. Decline and Revival
  • Aaron’s Rod, 1708–1806
    • 4. The Great Leverett
    • 5. Wadsworth to Langdon
    • 6. ‘Good Old Colony Times’
    • 7. ‘Through Change and Through Storm’
    • 8. Federalists and Unitarians
  • The Augustan Age, 1806–1845
    • 9. President Kirkland
    • 10. Expansion and Reform
    • 11. President Quincy
  • The Age of Transition
    • 12. Minor Prophets
    • 13. War and Peace
  • The Olympian Age
    • 14. President Eliot
    • 15. The Harvest Season
    • 16. College Life from War to War
    • 17. The Lowell Administration
  • ‘The Age That Is Waiting Before’
    • 18. ‘To Advance Learning’
  • Appendix. Statistics of Growth, 1869–1936
  • Index

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