Cover: To the Ends of the Earth in PAPERBACK

To the Ends of the Earth

Women’s Search for Education in Medicine

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$39.00 • £31.95 • €35.00

ISBN 9780674893047

Publication Date: 04/01/1995

Short

264 pages

27 halftones

World

  • List of Illustrations*
  • Prologue: 1871
  • 1. Women and the Study of Medicine
    • Women in an Economic Squeeze
    • Why Women Should Not Be Doctors
    • The American Context
    • Medical Colleges for Women
    • Segregation and Its Effects
    • The American Achievement
  • 2. Zurich and Paris
    • Rendezvous in Zurich
    • Nadezhda Suslova: The Russian Pioneer
    • The Legend of Frances Elizabeth Morgan
    • First American: Susan Dimock
    • The Russian Crisis
    • The Opening of Paris
    • A New Beginning
  • 3. The Great Migration
    • After the Pioneers
    • The Opening of Bern
    • Geneva and Lausanne
    • The Fight for the Internship in France
    • Floodtide
    • The End of an Era
  • 4. Women, Medicine, and Revolution in Russia
    • Higher Education for Women
    • The Case of Varvara Kashevarova
    • Medical Courses for Women
    • New Setbacks
    • Triumph and Chaos
  • 5. Imperial Germany
    • Verboten: The Ban on Women in Medicine
    • The Bitter Debate
    • The Turn of the Tide
    • Before the War
  • 6. The Fight for Coeducation in Britain
    • The Battle of Edinburgh
    • Why Women Should Not Study with Men
    • A Women’s School in London
    • New Openings for Women
  • 7. America: Triumph and Paradox
    • Coeducation and Separatism
    • Coeducation Slowly Advances
    • The Demise of the Women’s Schools
    • Success and Disappointment
  • Epilogue: Since 1914
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • * Illustrations
    • Mary Corinna Putnam
    • Mary H. Thompson. Chicago Historical Society
    • Ann Preston. Archives and Special Collections on Women in Medicine, Medical College of Pennsylvania
    • Marie Zakrzewska. Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College
    • An obstetrical examination. From Samuel Gregory, Medical Morals (ca. 1852)
    • Four American women who studied in Paris. Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College
    • Nadezhda Suslova. Medizinhistorisches Institut, University of Zurich
    • Susan Dimock. Medizinhistorisches Institut, University of Zurich
    • Maria Bokova. Medizinhistorisches Institut, University of Zurich
    • Elizabeth Morgan. Medizinhistorisches Institut, University of Zurich
    • Friedrich Erismann. Courtesy of Rudolf Mumenthaler
    • Marie Vögtlin. Medizinhistorisches Institut, University of Zurich
    • August Forel
    • Edmund Rose
    • Elizabeth Garrett taking her examination in Paris
    • A caricature of women students in Zurich. Medizinhistorisches Institut, University of Zurich
    • Madeleine Brès
    • Varvara Kashevarova
    • A Russian woman student of the early 1880s. From a painting by Nikolaj Jarošenko
    • Elizabeth Garrett Anderson. From a painting by Laura Herford
    • Vera Figner
    • Sophia Jex-Blake
    • Cartoon on “The Coming Race.” Punch (1872)
    • Clinical instruction in London in the 1880s
    • A student and her teacher, ca. 1895. Archives and Special Collections on Women in Medicine, Medical College of Pennsylvania
    • Cambridge University students protesting against women in 1897. Cambridgeshire Collection, Cambridgeshire Libraries
    • Students in an anatomy laboratory in Philadelphia, 1897. Archives and Special Collections on Women in Medicine, Medical College of Pennsylvania

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