Cover: The United States and China: Fourth Edition, Revised and Enlarged, from Harvard University PressCover: The United States and China in PAPERBACK

The United States and China

Fourth Edition, Revised and Enlarged

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$50.00 • £40.95 • €45.00

ISBN 9780674924383

Publication Date: 01/01/1983

Short

660 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

40 halftones, 6 line illustrations, 7 maps, 1 table

World

  • Foreword [Edwin O. Reischauer]
  • Preface, 1983, by John King Fairbank
  • Introduction
    • 1. The Chinese Scene
      • The Contrast of North and South
      • China’s Origins
      • The Harmony of Man and Nature
  • Part I: The Old Order
    • 2. The Nature of Chinese Society
      • Social Structure
      • The Peasant: Family and Kinship
      • The Market Community
      • Early China as an “Oriental” Society
      • The Medieval Flowering
      • The Gentry Class
      • The Chinese Written Language—The Scholar
      • Chinese Writing
      • The Scholar Class
      • Nondevelopment of Capitalism—The Merchant
    • 3. The Confucian Pattern
      • Confucian Principles
      • Government by Moral Prestige
      • Early Achievements in Bureaucratic Administration
      • The Classical Orthodoxy
      • Neo-Confucianism Chinese Militarism
      • Individualism, Chinese Style
      • The Nondevelopment of Science
    • 4. Alien Rule and Dynastic Cycles
      • Nomad Conquest
      • The First Sino-Foreign Empires
      • The Manchu Achievement
      • The Nature of Chinese Nationalism
      • The Dynastic Cycle
    • 5. The Political Tradition
      • Bureaucracy
      • Central Controls
      • Government as Organized “Corruption”
      • Law
      • Religion
      • Taoism
      • Buddhism
      • Chinese Humanism
      • Folk Sects and Peasant Rebellion
  • Part II: The Revolutionary Process
    • 6. The Western Invasion
      • European versus Chinese Expansion
      • The Arab Role
      • The Ming Explorations
      • Early Maritime Contact
      • The Jesuit Success
      • China’s Impact on Europe
      • The Tribute System
      • The Canton System and Its Collapse
      • The Treaty System
      • Extraterritoriality
      • The Demographic Disaster
    • 7. Rebellion and Restoration
      • The White Lotus as a Prototype
      • The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom
      • The Taiping Religion
      • Taiping Communism
      • The Nien and Other Rebels
      • The Restoration of Confucian Government
      • “China’s Response to the West” in Retrospect
    • 8. Reform and Revolution
      • The Self-Strengthening Movement
      • Imperialism and Reform in 1898
      • Revolutionaries versus Reformers
      • Sun Yat-sen
      • Liang Ch’i-ch’ao
      • Dynastic Reform and Republican Revolution
      • The New Nationalism
      • The Revolutionary Leadership
    • 9. The Rise of the Kuomintang
      • The Search for a New Order
      • The Collapse of Parliamentary Democracy
      • The Republic’s Decline into Warlordism
      • The Growth of Urban Nationalism
      • The May Fourth Movement
      • The Student Movement and New Literature
      • The Nationalist Revolution
      • The Kuomintang–Communist Alliance
      • The Nationalist Accession to Power
    • 10. The Nanking Government
      • Political Development
      • Party Dictatorship
      • Rights Recovery
      • The Rise of Chiang Kai-shek
      • Echoes of Confucianism
      • Roots of Totalitarianism
      • Progress toward Industrialization
      • Transportation
      • Industry
      • Banking and Fiscal Policy
      • Public Finance
      • Local Government
      • The Rural Problem
    • 11. The Rise of the Communist Party
      • Vicissitudes of the First Decade
      • The Attractions of Communism
      • The Comintern’s Difficulties
      • The Rise of Mao Tse-tung
      • The Maoist Strategy
      • Yenan and Wartime Expansion
      • Organization of Popular Support
      • Wartime Ideological Development
      • The New Democracy
      • Liberation
  • Part III: The United States and the People’s Republic
    • 12. Our Inherited China Policy
      • American Expansion and Britain’s Empire
      • America’s Role within Britain’s Informal Empire
      • The American Ambivalence about China
      • The Evolution of the Open Door
      • The Integrity of China
      • The Nature of the American Interest
      • America’s Contribution and the Fate of Liberalism
    • 13. United States Policy and the Nationalist Defeat
      • American Aid and Mediation
      • The Nationalist Debacle
      • The “Loss of China” in America
      • Our Ally Taiwan
    • 14. The People’s Republic: Establishing the New Order
      • Political Control
      • Coalition Government
      • The Party, Government, and Army Structures
      • The Mass Organizations
      • Law and Security
      • Economic Reconstruction
      • Land Reform
      • Social Reorganization
      • Thought Reform
      • Communism and Confucianism
      • Criticism, Literary and Political
      • The Korean War and Soviet Aid
    • 15. The Struggle for Socialist Transformation
      • Collectivization of Agriculture
      • The First Five-Year Plan
      • The Struggles with Intellectuals and with Cadres
      • China in the World Scene
      • The Great Leap Forward
      • The Communes
    • 16. The Second Revolution
      • Mao and His Opponents
      • The Two Approaches to China’s Revolution
      • The Sino–Soviet Split
      • The Growth of Bureaucratic Evils
      • Cadre Life
      • Mao Revives the Revolution: The Socialist Education
      • Movement
      • Repoliticizing the Army
      • The Cultural Revolution
      • The Aftermath
      • Mao Tse-tung’s Monument
    • 17. Perspectives: China and Ourselves
      • Our China Policy and the Wars in Korea and Vietnam
      • New Perspectives of the 1970s
      • China Today in the Light of Her Past
      • Echoes of the Dynastic Cycle
      • Processes of Modernization
      • Problems of the New Order
  • Epilogue, 1983
  • Suggested Reading
  • 1983 Addenda to Suggested Reading
  • Index to Suggested Reading
  • General Index
  • Credits for Illustrations

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