Cover: Value-Focused Thinking: A Path to Creative Decisionmaking, from Harvard University PressCover: Value-Focused Thinking in PAPERBACK

Value-Focused Thinking

A Path to Creative Decisionmaking

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$26.00 • £20.95 • €23.50

ISBN 9780674931985

Publication Date: 02/01/1996

Short

432 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

46 line illustrations, 32 tables

World

  • I. Concepts
    • 1. Thinking about Values
      • 1.1 Value-Focused Thinking
      • 1.2 Creating Alternatives
      • 1.3 Identifying Decision Opportunities
      • 1.4 Thinking about Values
      • 1.5 The Uses of Value-Focused Thinking
    • 2. The Framework of Value-Focused Thinking
      • 2.1 Framing a Decision Situation
      • 2.2 Fundamental Objectives
      • 2.3 The Decision Context
      • 2.4 Guiding Strategic Thinking and Action
      • 2.5 The Framework
      • 2.6 Comparing Alternative-Focused and Value-Focused Thinking
      • 2.7 Ethics and Value Neutrality
  • II. Foundations
    • 3. Identifying and Structuring Objectives
      • 3.1 Identifying Objectives
      • 3.2 Identifying Fundamental Objectives
      • 3.3 Structures of Objectives
      • 3.4 How to Structure Objectives
      • 3.5 Desirable Properties of Fundamental Objectives
      • 3.6 Relating Objectives Hierarchies and Objectives Networks
      • 3.7 Incomplete Objectives Hierarchies and Networks
      • 3.8 Objectives Hierarchies for Groups
    • 4. Measuring the Achievement of Objectives
      • 4.1 The Concept of an Attribute
      • 4.2 The Types of Attributes
      • 4.3 Developing Constructed Attributes
      • 4.4 Use of Proxy Attributes
      • 4.5 Desirable Properties of Attributes
      • 4.6 The Decision of Selecting Attributes
      • 4.7 Connecting Decision Situations with Attributes
    • 5. Quantifying Objectives with a Value Model
      • 5.1 Building a Value Model
      • 5.2 Multiple-Objective Value Models
      • 5.3 Single-Objective Value Models
      • 5.4 Prioritizing Objectives
      • 5.5 The Art of Assessing Value Models
      • 5.6 Issues to Consider in Value Assessments
  • III. Uses
    • 6. Uncovering Hidden Objectives
      • 6.1 Insights from Attributes
      • 6.2 Insights from Violations of Independence Assumptions
      • 6.3 Insights from Value Tradeoffs
      • 6.4 Insights from Single-Attribute Objective Functions
      • 6.5 Insights from Multiple Value Assessments
    • 7. Creating Alternatives for a Single Decisionmaker
      • 7.1 Counteracting Cognitive Biases
      • 7.2 Use of Objectives
      • 7.3 Use of Strategic Objectives
      • 7.4 Focus on High-Value Alternatives
      • 7.5 Use of Evaluated Alternatives
      • 7.6 Generic Alternatives
      • 7.7 Coordinated Alternatives
      • 7.8 Process Alternatives
      • 7.9 Removing Constraints
      • 7.10 Better Utilization of Resources
      • 7.11 Screening to Identify Good Alternatives
      • 7.12 Alternatives for a Series of Similar Decisions
    • 8. Creating Alternatives for Multiple Decisionmakers
      • 8.1 Pleasing Other Stakeholders
      • 8.2 Stakeholder Influence on Your Consequences
      • 8.3 Clarifying Stakeholder Values for Group Decisions
      • 8.4 Creating Alternatives for Negotiations
    • 9. Identifying Decision Opportunities
      • 9.1 Use of Strategic Objectives
      • 9.2 Use of Resources Available
      • 9.3 A Broader Decision Context
      • 9.4 Monitoring Achievement
      • 9.5 Establishing a Process
      • 9.6 Negotiating for Your Side and for the Other Side
      • 9.7 Being in the Right Place at the Right Time
      • 9.8 When You Have No Idea about What to Do
    • 10. Insights for the Decisionmaking Process
      • 10.1 Guiding Information Collection
      • 10.2 Evaluating Alternatives
      • 10.3 Interconnecting Decisions
      • 10.4 Improving Communication
      • 10.5 Facilitating Involvement in Multiple-Stakeholder Decisions
      • 10.6 Guiding Strategic Thinking
  • IV. Applications
    • 11. Selected Applications
      • 11.1 NASA Leadership in Space
      • 11.2 Transporting Nuclear Waste
      • 11.3 Research on Climate Change
      • 11.4 Air Pollution in Los Angeles
      • 11.5 Design of Integrated Circuit Testers
      • 11.6 Collaborating on a Book
    • 12. Value-Focused Thinking at British Columbia Hydra
      • 12.1 Identification and Structuring of the Strategic Objectives
      • 12.2 First Revision of the Strategic Objectives and the Preliminary Attributes
      • 12.3 Current Version of the Strategic Objectives and Attributes
      • 12.4 The Quantitative Value Assessment
      • 12.5 Insights from the Value Assessment
      • 12.6 Decision Opportunities
    • 13. Value-Focused Thinking for My Decisions
      • 13.1 Strategic Objectives for Life
      • 13.2 Guiding Involvement in Professional Activities
      • 13.3 Decisions about Health and Safety
      • 13.4 Professional Decisions
      • 13.5 Personal Decisions
      • 13.6 Value-Focused Thinking and You
  • References
  • Index of Applications and Examples
  • General Index

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