Cover: Video Economics in HARDCOVER

Video Economics

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$96.50 • £77.95 • €87.00

ISBN 9780674937161

Publication Date: 04/01/1992

Short

384 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

33 line illustrations, 47 tables

World

As deregulation loosens government controls and fosters the television industry’s competitive spirit, uncharted issues face management in such areas as cable expansion, new networks, technological progress and marketing opportunities. Bruce Owen and Steven Wildman address these emerging situations and outline strategies to assist the industry in its adjustment to a greater freedom, while still preserving its primary role as purveyors of a free flow of information.—George L. George, Back Stage Shoot

Video Economics is an ambitious book, and overall, I rate it to be a significant contribution to the literature and a good resource for students.—David Waterman, Journal of Communication

Video Economics is aimed at those for whom a fundamental understanding of the economics of the video industry is essential to their success in the industry: broadcasting, communication, journalism, cinema, and business students; advertising and media executives; and public policy makers. This book draws on its authors’ backgrounds as academics, government officials, and consultants. Their wide-ranging experiences significantly enrich the ‘real world’ content of the work… The book is commendable for the depth that it provides, [and it] also is steeped with interesting facts and insights.—Mark Zupan, Journal of Economic Literature

Writing as economists, the authors argue for a video marketplace that is not only competitive, but offers the greatest potential for freedom of expression and a diverse exchange of ideas.—Alan B. Albarran, Journalism Quarterly

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