Cover: We Have Never Been Modern, from Harvard University PressCover: We Have Never Been Modern in PAPERBACK

We Have Never Been Modern

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$33.00 • £26.95 • €29.50

ISBN 9780674948396

Publication Date: 10/15/1993

Short

168 pages

6 x 9 inches

8 line illustrations

World

  • Acknowledgements
  • 1. Crisis
    • 1.1 The Proliferation of Hybrids
    • 1.2 Retying the Gordian Knot
    • 1.3 The Crisis of the Critical Stance
    • 1.4 1989: The Year of Miracles
    • 1.5 What Does It Mean To Be A Modern?
  • 2. Constitution
    • 2.1 The Modern Constitution
    • 2.2 Boyle and His Objects
    • 2.3 Hobbes and His Subjects
    • 2.4 The Mediation of the Laboratory
    • 2.5 The Testimony of Nonhumans
    • 2.6 The Double Artifact of the Laboratory and the Leviathan
    • 2.7 Scientific Representation and Political Representation
    • 2.8 The Constitutional Guarantees of the Modern
    • 2.9 The Fourth Guarantee: The Crossed-out God
    • 2.10 The Power of the Modern Critique
    • 2.11 The Invincibility of the Moderns
    • 2.12 What the Constitution Clarifies and What It Obscures
    • 2.13 The End of Denunciation
    • 2.14 We Have Never Been Modern
  • 3. Revolution
    • 3.1 The Moderns, Victims of Their Own Success
    • 3.2 What Is a Quasi-Object?
    • 3.3 Philosophies Stretched Over the Yawning Gap
    • 3.4 The End of Ends
    • 3.5 Semiotic Turns
    • 3.6 Who Has Forgotten Being?
    • 3.7 The Beginning of the Past
    • 3.8 The Revolutionary Miracle
    • 3.9 The End of the Passing Past
    • 3.10 Triage and Multiple Times
    • 3.11 A Copernican Counter-revolution
    • 3.12 From Intermediaries to Mediators
    • 3.13 Accusation, Causation
    • 3.14 Variable Ontologies
    • 3.15 Connecting the Four Modern Repertoires
  • 4. Relativism
    • 4.1 How to End the Asymmetry
    • 4.2 The Principle of Symmetry Generalized
    • 4.3 The Import-Export System of the Two Great Divides
    • 4.4 Anthropology Comes Home from the Tropics
    • 4.5 There Are No Cultures
    • 4.6 Sizeable Differences
    • 4.7 Archimedes’ coup d’état
    • 4.8 Absolute Relativisim and Relativist Relativism
    • 4.9 Small Mistakes Concerning the Disenchantment of the World
    • 4.10 Even a Longer Network Remains Local at All Points
    • 4.11 The Leviathan is a Skein of Networks
    • 4.12 A Perverse Taste for the Margins
    • 4.13 Avoid Adding New Crimes to Old
    • 4.14 Transcendences Abound
  • 5. Redistribution
    • 5.1 The Impossible Modernization
    • 5.2 Final Examinations
    • 5.3 Humanism Redistributed
    • 5.4 The Nonmodern Constitution
    • 5.5 The Parliament of Things
  • Bibliography
  • Index

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