Cover: The Wisdom of the Hive: The Social Physiology of Honey Bee Colonies, from Harvard University PressCover: The Wisdom of the Hive in HARDCOVER

The Wisdom of the Hive

The Social Physiology of Honey Bee Colonies

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$139.00 • £111.95 • €125.00

ISBN 9780674953765

Publication Date: 02/15/1996

Short

318 pages

8 x 9-1/4 inches

6 color illustrations, 20 halftones, 116 line illustrations, 7 tables

World

  • Preface
  • I. Introduction
    • 1. The Issues
      • 1.1. The Evolution of Biological Organization
      • 1.2. The Honey Bee Colony as a Unit of Function
      • 1.3. Analytic Scheme
    • 2. The Honey Bee Colony
      • 2.1. Worker Anatomy and Physiology
      • 2.2. Worker Life History
      • 2.3. Nest Architecture
      • 2.4. The Annual Cycle of a Colony
      • 2.5. Communication about Food Sources
      • 2.6. Food Collection and Honey Production
    • 3. The Foraging Abilities of a Colony
      • 3.1. Exploiting Food Sources over a Vast Region around the Hive
      • 3.2. Surveying the Countryside for Rich Food Sources
      • 3.3. Responding Quickly to Valuable Discoveries
      • 3.4. Choosing among Food Sources
      • 3.5. Adjusting Selectivity in Relation to Forage Abundance
      • 3.6. Regulating Comb Construction
      • 3.7. Regulating Pollen Collection
      • 3.8. Regulating Water Collection
      • Summary
  • II. Experimental Analysis
    • 4. Methods and Equipment
      • 4.1. The Observation Hive
      • 4.2. The Hut for the Observation Hive
      • 4.3. The Bees
      • 4.4. Sugar Water Feeders
      • 4.5. Labeling Bees
      • 4.6. Measuring the Total Number of Bees Visiting a Feeder
      • 4.7. Observing Bees of Known Age
      • 4.8. Recording the Behavior of Bees in the Hive
      • 4.9. The Scale Hive
      • 4.10. Censusing a Colony
    • 5. Allocation of Labor among Forage Sites
      • How a Colony Acquires Information about Food Sources
        • 5.1. Which Bees Gather the Information?
        • 5.2. Which Information Is Shared?
        • 5.3. Where Information Is Shared inside the Hive
        • 5.4. The Coding of Information about Profitability
        • 5.5. The Bees’ Criterion of Profitability
        • 5.6. The Relationship between Nectar-Source
        • 5.7. The Adaptive Tuning of Dance Thresholds
        • 5.8. How a Forager Determines the Profitability of a Nectar Source
        • Summary
      • How a Colony Acts on Information about Food Sources
        • 5.9. Employed Foragers versus Unemployed Foragers
        • 5.10. How Unemployed Foragers Read the Information on the Dance Floor?
        • 5.11. How Employed Foragers Respond to Information about Food-Source Profitability
        • 5.12. The Correct Distribution of Foragers among Nectar Sources
        • 5.13. Cross Inhibition between Forager Groups
        • 5.14. The Pattern and Effectiveness of Forager Allocation among Nectar Sources
        • Summary
    • 6. Coordination of Nectar Collecting and Nectar Processing
      • How a Colony Adjusts Its Collecting Rate with Respect to the External Nectar Supply
        • 6.1. Rapid Increase in the Number of Nectar Foragers via the Waggle Dance
        • 6.2. Increase in the Number of Bees Committed to Foraging via the Shaking Signal
      • How a Colony Adjusts Its Processing Rate with Respect to Its Collecting Rate
        • 6.3. Rapid Increase in the Number of Nectar Processors via the Tremble Dance
        • 6.4. Which Bees Become Additional Food Storers?
        • Summary
    • 7. Regulation of Comb Construction
      • 7.1. Which Bees Build Comb?
      • 7.2. How Comb Builders Know When to Build Comb
      • 7.3. How the Quantity of Empty Comb Affects Nectar Foraging
    • 8. Regulation of Pollen Collection
      • 8.1. The Inverse Relationship between Pollen Collection and the Pollen Reserve
      • 8.2. How Pollen Foragers Adjust Their Colony’s Rate of Pollen Collection
      • 8.3. How Pollen Foragers Receive Feedback from the Pollen Reserves
      • 8.4. The Mechanism of Indirect Feedback
      • 8.5. Why the Feedback Flows Indirectly
      • 8.6. How a Colony’s Foragers Are Allocated between Pollen and Nectar Collection
      • Summary
    • 9. Regulation of Water Collection
      • 9.1. The Importance of Variable Demand
      • 9.2. Patterns of Water and Nectar Collection during Hive Overheating
      • 9.3. Which Bees Collect Water?
      • 9.4. What Stimulates Bees to Begin Collecting Water?
      • 9.5. What Tells Water Collectors to Continue or Stop Their Activity
      • 9.6. Why Does a Water Collector’s Unloading Experience Change When Her Colony’s Need for Water Changes?
      • Summary
  • III. Overview
    • 10. The Main Features of Colony Organization
      • 10.1. Division of Labor Based on Temporary Specializations
      • 10.2. Absence of Physical Connections between Workers
      • 10.3. Diverse Pathways of Information Flow
      • 10.4. High Economy of Communication
      • 10.5. Numerous Mechanisms of Negative Feedback
      • 10.6. Coordination without Central Planning
    • 11. Enduring Lessons from the Hive
  • Glossary
  • Bibliography
  • Index

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