HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: A Continuous Revolution: Making Sense of Cultural Revolution Culture, from Harvard University PressCover: A Continuous Revolution in PAPERBACK

Harvard East Asian Monographs 343

A Continuous Revolution

Making Sense of Cultural Revolution Culture

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$39.95 • £31.95 • €36.00

ISBN 9780674970533

Publication Date: 09/26/2016

Text

502 pages

7 x 10 inches

14 halftones, 113 line illustrations

Harvard University Asia Center > Harvard East Asian Monographs

World

Mittler’s groundbreaking study assesses Cultural Revolution arts—music, drama, opera, painting, comics, and literature—as more than propaganda, demonstrating that they were paradigm-shifting works that left indelible impacts on China’s artistic culture… Magisterial in scope, this book proves that art of the Cultural Revolution period was not an aberration but rather the most complete expression of trends that had begun in the early 20th century, when yearnings for a great hero first entered popular discourse. As the apotheosis of mass culture, the Cultural Revolution produced truly popular art that spoke to uneducated farmers and urbane intellectuals alike and was experienced in multiple ways that belie claims of hegemony. Accompanied by a website that includes further text, images, music, and video clips, this will serve as the definitive study of its genre for years to come.—N. E. Barnes, Choice

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Jacket: Awakening: How Gays and Lesbians Brought Marriage Equality to America, by Nathaniel Frank, from Harvard University Press

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To celebrate Pride Month, we are highlighting excerpts from books that explore the lives and experiences of the LGBT+ community. Nathaniel Frank’s Awakening: How Gays and Lesbians Brought Marriage Equality to America tells the dramatic story of the struggle for same-sex couples to legally marry, something that is now taken for granted. Below, he describes the beginnings of the gay rights movement. For homophiles of the 1950s, identifying as gay was almost always a risky and radical act