HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: No Great Wall: Trade, Tariffs, and Nationalism in Republican China, 1927–1945, from Harvard University PressCover: No Great Wall in HARDCOVER

Harvard East Asian Monographs 397

No Great Wall

Trade, Tariffs, and Nationalism in Republican China, 1927–1945

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$39.95 • £31.95 • €36.00

ISBN 9780674970601

Publication Date: 07/10/2017

Text

292 pages

6 x 9 inches

13 line illustrations, 5 maps, 13 tables

Harvard University Asia Center > Harvard East Asian Monographs

World

  • List of Maps, Tables, and Figures*
  • Acknowledgments
  • Notes on the Text
  • Abbreviations
  • Introduction
  • 1. Nationalism, Nationalists, and Informal Empire
  • 2. Making Nationalist Tariff Policy
  • 3. The Maritime Customs as Economic Modernity
  • 4. Nationalist Tariff Policy and the Import Trade
  • 5. Trade, Tariffs, and Governance
  • 6. Trade, Tariffs, and War, 1937–1945
  • Conclusion
  • Appendix 1: Custom Houses
  • Appendix 2: Chinese and Japanese Names
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • * Maps, Tables, and Figures
    • Maps
      • Map 0.1. Custom houses, economic regions, and major transport houses.
      • Map 3.1. Distribution of custom houses.
      • Map 5.1. Nationalist-controlled areas, 1928–37.
      • Map 5.2. Smuggling routes in the Tianjin area.
      • Map 6.1. Japanese-occupied area of China, 1940.
    • Tables
      • Table 0.1. Foreign trade, modern manufacturing, and agriculture as a percentage of China’s gross national product.
      • Table 2.1. Customs revenue and income tax as a percentage of central government revenue, selected countries, 1928–37.
      • Table 2.2. Chinese and foreign Maritime Customs staff, 1926–48.
      • Table 2.3. Foreign and domestic debt interest paid, as a percentage of central government expenditures, selected countries, 1928–37.
      • Table 3.1. Scott Harding schedule of importers’ costs.
      • Table 4.1. Wanxian sugar prices, 1922 and 1931.
      • Table 4.2. Wagner’s fertilizer experiments.
      • Table 5.1. Smuggled goods entering Tianjin Eastern Railway Station, 21 May 1936: Song Wuwei’s estimates.
      • Table 5.2. Smuggled goods leaving Tianjin Eastern Railway Station, 21 May 1936: Song Wuwei’s estimates.
      • Table 6.1. Personal income tax receipts (nominal value) as a percentage of total central government receipts, 1937–45.
      • Table 6.3. National government receipts, 1937–45.
      • Table 6.4. National government receipts, 1937–45, adjusted for inflation using July 1937 prices.
    • Figures
      • Figure 2.1. Relation of combined Maritime and Native Customs revenue to China’s foreign loans and indemnities, 1912–37, in pounds sterling.
      • Figure 2.2. Relation of combined Maritime and Native Customs revenue to China’s foreign loans and indemnities, 1912–37, in Haiguan taels.
      • Figure 3.1. Calculation of duty-paying values under the Scott Harding schedule.
      • Figure 4.1. Maritime Customs revenue, 1928–37, in Standard Dollars.
      • Figure 4.2. Value of import tariffs as a percentage of total import value, 1928–40.
      • Figure 4.3. Shanghai customs revenue, 1926–33.
      • Figure 4.4. The Shanghai and Hankou shares of total tariff revenue, 1926–40.
      • Figure 4.5. Quantity and nominal value of imported sugar, 1925–40.
      • Figure 4.6. Quantity and nominal value of imported kerosene, 1925–40.
      • Figure 4.7. Nominal kerosene prices for Tianjin and Ningbo, 1922–31.
      • Figure 4.8. Quantity and nominal value of imported ammonium sulphate, 1925–40.
      • Figure 4.9. Quantity and nominal value of imported cigarettes, 1925–40.
      • Figure 6.1. Share of Maritime Customs revenue collected in unoccupied China, September 1937–September 1941.

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