Cover: Karl Marx: Greatness and Illusion, from Harvard University PressCover: Karl Marx in HARDCOVER

Karl Marx

Greatness and Illusion

Add to Cart

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$35.00 • £28.95 • €31.50

ISBN 9780674971615

Publication Date: 10/03/2016

Trade

768 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

30 halftones, 4 maps

Belknap Press

World rights except United Kingdom, Commonwealth & Europe

  • Illustrations*
  • Maps
    • 1. The Rhineland before 1789—‘The Monks’ Corridor’
    • 2. The French Occupation of the Rhineland during the Revolution and the Napoleonic Era
    • 3. Paris and the Battles of the Franco-Prussian War
    • 4. Marx’s London, 1848–1883
  • Acknowledgements
  • Prologue: The Making of an Icon, 1883–1920
  • 1. Fathers and Sons: The Ambiguities of Becoming a Prussian
  • 2. The Lawyer, the Poet and the Lover
  • 3. Berlin and the Approaching Twilight of the Gods
  • 4. Rebuilding the Polis: Reason Takes On the Christian State
  • 5. The Alliance of Those Who Think and Those Who Suffer: Paris, 1844
  • 6. Exile in Brussels, 1845–8
  • 7. The Approach of Revolution: The Problem about Germany
  • 8. The Mid-Century Revolutions
  • 9. London
  • 10. The Critique of Political Economy
  • 11. Capital, Social Democracy and the International
  • 12. Back to the Future
  • Epilogue
  • Notes and References
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • * Illustrations
    • 1. The young Marx
    • 2. Portrait of Jenny Marx, undated
    • 3. Karl Marx, editor of the Rheinische Zeitung 1842–3, by Ernst Schaumann
    • 4. Heinrich Heine with Jenny and Karl Marx. Drawing, 1848
    • 5. Eleanor Marx, at the age of 18, 1873
    • 6. Karl Marx’s eldest daughters, Jenny and Laura, c. 1865. Photograph
    • 7. Karl Marx and his wife, Jenny, c. 1850s
    • 8. Helene Demuth
    • 9. Friedrich Engels, 1870
    • 10. Moses Hess, 1847
    • 11. Mikhail Aleksandrovich Bakunin
    • 12. Pierre Joseph Proudhon
    • 13. Dr Andreas Gottschalk, portrait by Wilhelm Kleinenbroich, 1849
    • 14. Ferdinand Lassalle, c. 1860
    • 15. Dr Eduard Gumpert
    • 16. Wilhelm Wolff
    • 17. Trier, a view over the river Mosel to Trier. Steel engraving, undated (c. 1850?), by Johann Poppel after a drawing by Ludwig Lange (1808–1868)
    • 18. The title page of the Deutsch-Französische Jahrbücher, Paris, 1844
    • 19. The bodies of those killed during the February street fighting paraded through Paris. (Engraving by J Gaildrau in a history of France.)
    • 20. Session of the Commission des travailleurs, Paris, 1948
    • 21. Barricade fighting in Cologne, 1848
    • 22. Berlin, 1848, illustration from Carl Schurz, Reminiscences, Vol. I (McClure Publishing Co., 1907)
    • 23. The Chartist Meeting on Kennington Common, 10 April 1848, from F. Dimond and R. Taylor, Crown & Camera: The Royal Family and Photography 1842–1910 (Harmondsworth, 1987)
    • 24. The First Edition of ‘Neue Rheinische Zeitung’ 1 June 1848
    • 25. Thibault: The barricade of Saint-Maur-Popincourt 26 June 1848
    • 26. Insurgents in custody
    • 27. Opening ceremony of the International Exhibition
    • 28. William Powell Frith, Ramsgate Sands (Life at the Seaside), 1851–54
    • 29. Aftermath of the Commune
    • 30. Chinese poster from the Cultural Revolution celebrating the centenary of the Paris Commune

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket: A Brief History of Equality, by Thomas Piketty, from Harvard University Press

Five Reasons Why You Should Read Thomas Piketty’s A Brief History of Equality

In his surprising and powerful new work, A Brief History of Equality, Thomas Piketty reminds us that the grand sweep of history gives us reasons to be optimistic. Over the centuries, he shows, we have been moving toward greater equality. We asked him about his impassioned new book: why he wrote it, how it’s optimistic, and what we need to do to continue making progress on creating an equitable world.