Cover: Students of the Dream: Resegregation in a Southern City, from Harvard University PressCover: Students of the Dream in HARDCOVER

Students of the Dream

Resegregation in a Southern City

Yow’s evocative and enlightening work convincingly argues that there is vast potential to reimagine integration for contemporary times. Students of the Dream is a major contribution to our understanding of school integration’s impact upon society.—Susan Eaton, author of Integration Nation: Immigrants, Refugees, and America at Its Best

Yow has done something very brave in our data-driven era; she has moved in close and watched and listened to students describe their experiences with desegregation, integration, and resegregation. Even more astonishing, she has dared to follow the students in offering an answer: a new era of integration they are working so hard, with so few resources, to build. Beautifully written, emotionally rich, and compelling, Students of the Dream is a must-read for today’s teachers and students as well as everyone who believes integrated public education is essential to the future of our democracy.—Grace Elizabeth Hale, author of A Nation of Outsiders

Yow examines the desegregation and resegregation of Marietta’s schools through the lived experience of young people in classrooms, extracurricular activities, and sports. Her account takes the story into the present day in order to include the introduction of large numbers of Latino, immigrant, and even undocumented students into the district. This engagingly written work points us forward to strategies for accomplishing a more equitable future in American education.—Tracy E. K’Meyer, author of From Brown to Meredith

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Jacket: Memory Speaks: On Losing and Reclaiming Language and Self, by Julie Sedivy, from Harvard University Press

Lost in Translation: Reclaiming Lost Language

In Memory Speaks: On Losing and Reclaiming Language and Self, Julie Sedivy sets out to understand the science of language loss and the potential for renewal. Sedivy takes on the psychological and social world of multilingualism, exploring the human brain’s capacity to learn—and forget—languages at various stages of life. She argues that the struggle to remain connected to an ancestral language and culture is a site of common ground: people from all backgrounds can recognize the crucial role of language in forming a sense of self.