HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: Honored and Dishonored Guests: Westerners in Wartime Japan, from Harvard University PressCover: Honored and Dishonored Guests in HARDCOVER

Harvard East Asian Monographs 399

Honored and Dishonored Guests

Westerners in Wartime Japan

Add to Cart

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$49.95 • £39.95 • €45.00

ISBN 9780674975149

Publication Date: 03/06/2017

Text

372 pages

6 x 9 inches

23 illus., 1 map, 7 tables

Harvard University Asia Center > Harvard East Asian Monographs

World

  • List of Tables and Figures*
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • I. Caucasians and Race in Imperial Japan
    • 1. Racism, Race Consciousness, and Imperial Japan
      • A Normative Racism
      • Aspects of Race Consciousness in Imperial Japan
      • Sources of Cognitive Dissonance
    • 2. Privilege and Prejudice: Being a Westerner in Imperial Japan
      • Early Foreign Settlements
      • The Yokohama Community
      • Ornaments in Isolation: The Frank and Balk Families
      • Class Insularity at Western Resorts
    • 3. Handling the Other Within: Approaches to Preemptive Containment (1939–41)
      • Direct and Indirect Forms of Containment
      • Japan’s “Jewish Problem” and the Kobe Community
      • A Repressed, Mobilized Christianity
  • II. Lives in Limbo: Wartime Containment in the Wake of Pearl Harbor
    • 4. First Responses and Containment Protocols after Pearl Harbor (1941–43)
      • A New Taxonomy of Foreigners
      • Temporary Detentions of Suspicious Enemy Nationals
      • Enemy Diplomatic Staff under House Arrest
      • Racialized Others: Jews and Asians
    • 5. Watched and Unseen: Nonenemy Nationals after Pearl Harbor (1941–43)
      • Fracture and Emotional Conflict
      • Withdrawal and Invisibility
      • Japanese Ambivalence and Antiforeign Sentiment
    • 6. Fleeing for the Hills: Evacuee Communities in Hakone and Karuizawa (1943–45)
      • “Running Smoothly” in Gora
      • Karuizawa: A “Strange Miniature Babel”
  • III. Lives behind Walls: Japan’s Treatment of Enemy Civilians
    • 7. From Humiliation to Hunger: The Internment of Enemy Nationals (1941–45)
      • Camp Administration
      • The Initial Roundup (1941–42)
      • Stringency and Privation (1942–45)
    • 8. Torture and Testimony: The Incarceration of Suspected Spies (1944–45)
      • Interrogation
      • Trial and Imprisonment
      • Death and Liberation
    • 9. Race War? On Japanese Pragmatism and Racial Ambivalence
      • The Failure of Propaganda
      • Continuity and Change Following the Surrender
  • Epilogue
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • * Tables and Figures
    • Tables
      • 4.1. Populations of select enemy nationals in Japan on December 8, 1941
      • 4.2. Populations of select other foreign nationals in Japan on June 30, 1942
      • 4.3. Unofficial taxonomy of resident Western civilians in wartime Japan
      • 7.1. Foreigners interned at the start of the war
      • 7.2. Daily rations at seven civilian internment camps
      • 7.3. Resident enemy nationals interned at the end of the war, excluding certain civilians and interned Germans
      • 8.1. Foreign civilians in custody for suspicion of violating the National Defense Security Law and/or Military Secrets Protection Law as of July 1, 1945
    • Figures
      • 0.1. Map of Japan
      • 2.1. Yokohama meisai no zenzu (Detailed map of Yokohama), 1873
      • 2.2. The Apcar home on the Bluff, 1923
      • 2.3. Michael, Araxe, Diana, and Ruth Apcar, 1928
      • 2.4. Louis, Ludy, Amy, and Hugo Frank, Otaru, 1918
      • 2.5 Louis, Amy, Hugo, and Ludy Frank with friends, Sapporo, 1920s
      • 2.6. Hugo and Ludy Frank, Sapporo, 1920s
      • 2.7. Saint Joseph International College, ca. 1935
      • 2.8. Hugo, Louis, Amy, and Ludy Frank, Kamakura, 1934
      • 2.9. Louis Frank in his laboratory, Kōfu, 1938
      • 2.10. Arvid Balk, 1934
      • 2.11. Marie-Elise and Max Pestalozzi, ca. 1943
      • 2.12. Downtown Karuizawa, Taishō period
      • 3.1. Wilfrid Fleisher with Foreign Minister Matsuoka Y&omcar;suke
      • 4.1. Kondō Hidezō, “Sei-Jigoku” (Living hell), 1941
      • 6.1. The Hugo Frank family at the Fujiya Hotel in Gora, summer 1944
      • 6.2. The Haar family with maids in Karuizawa, June 1944
      • 6.3. The Haars at nursery school in Karuizawa, August 1944
      • 7.1. ICRC representatives Fritz Paravicini and Max Pestalozzi inspecting a camp in Ōmori
      • 9.1. Yasumoto Ryōichi, Amerika no baai: Kari dasareru kurowashi (In America: Black eagles sent off to hunt), 1943
      • 9.2. Yasumoto Ryōichi, Makoto ni kami wo osorezaru mono (Really, these guys don’t scare God), 1943
      • 9.3. Kondō Hidezō, Kami ikari (God’s wrath), 1944

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

(logo) SpeakOUT: 50th Anniversary

Speaking with SpeakOut Boston

We continue our celebration of Pride Month by talking with some of the speakers who volunteer with SpeakOUT Boston. They share their stories with a variety of audiences to foster a better understanding of the LGBTQ+ community, so we thought we’d ask them some questions of our own.