HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: Honored and Dishonored Guests: Westerners in Wartime Japan, from Harvard University PressCover: Honored and Dishonored Guests in HARDCOVER

Harvard East Asian Monographs 399

Honored and Dishonored Guests

Westerners in Wartime Japan

Add to Cart

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$49.95 • £39.95 • €45.00

ISBN 9780674975149

Publication Date: 03/06/2017

Text

372 pages

6 x 9 inches

23 illus., 1 map, 7 tables

Harvard University Asia Center > Harvard East Asian Monographs

World

  • List of Tables and Figures*
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • I. Caucasians and Race in Imperial Japan
    • 1. Racism, Race Consciousness, and Imperial Japan
      • A Normative Racism
      • Aspects of Race Consciousness in Imperial Japan
      • Sources of Cognitive Dissonance
    • 2. Privilege and Prejudice: Being a Westerner in Imperial Japan
      • Early Foreign Settlements
      • The Yokohama Community
      • Ornaments in Isolation: The Frank and Balk Families
      • Class Insularity at Western Resorts
    • 3. Handling the Other Within: Approaches to Preemptive Containment (1939–41)
      • Direct and Indirect Forms of Containment
      • Japan’s “Jewish Problem” and the Kobe Community
      • A Repressed, Mobilized Christianity
  • II. Lives in Limbo: Wartime Containment in the Wake of Pearl Harbor
    • 4. First Responses and Containment Protocols after Pearl Harbor (1941–43)
      • A New Taxonomy of Foreigners
      • Temporary Detentions of Suspicious Enemy Nationals
      • Enemy Diplomatic Staff under House Arrest
      • Racialized Others: Jews and Asians
    • 5. Watched and Unseen: Nonenemy Nationals after Pearl Harbor (1941–43)
      • Fracture and Emotional Conflict
      • Withdrawal and Invisibility
      • Japanese Ambivalence and Antiforeign Sentiment
    • 6. Fleeing for the Hills: Evacuee Communities in Hakone and Karuizawa (1943–45)
      • “Running Smoothly” in Gora
      • Karuizawa: A “Strange Miniature Babel”
  • III. Lives behind Walls: Japan’s Treatment of Enemy Civilians
    • 7. From Humiliation to Hunger: The Internment of Enemy Nationals (1941–45)
      • Camp Administration
      • The Initial Roundup (1941–42)
      • Stringency and Privation (1942–45)
    • 8. Torture and Testimony: The Incarceration of Suspected Spies (1944–45)
      • Interrogation
      • Trial and Imprisonment
      • Death and Liberation
    • 9. Race War? On Japanese Pragmatism and Racial Ambivalence
      • The Failure of Propaganda
      • Continuity and Change Following the Surrender
  • Epilogue
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • * Tables and Figures
    • Tables
      • 4.1. Populations of select enemy nationals in Japan on December 8, 1941
      • 4.2. Populations of select other foreign nationals in Japan on June 30, 1942
      • 4.3. Unofficial taxonomy of resident Western civilians in wartime Japan
      • 7.1. Foreigners interned at the start of the war
      • 7.2. Daily rations at seven civilian internment camps
      • 7.3. Resident enemy nationals interned at the end of the war, excluding certain civilians and interned Germans
      • 8.1. Foreign civilians in custody for suspicion of violating the National Defense Security Law and/or Military Secrets Protection Law as of July 1, 1945
    • Figures
      • 0.1. Map of Japan
      • 2.1. Yokohama meisai no zenzu (Detailed map of Yokohama), 1873
      • 2.2. The Apcar home on the Bluff, 1923
      • 2.3. Michael, Araxe, Diana, and Ruth Apcar, 1928
      • 2.4. Louis, Ludy, Amy, and Hugo Frank, Otaru, 1918
      • 2.5 Louis, Amy, Hugo, and Ludy Frank with friends, Sapporo, 1920s
      • 2.6. Hugo and Ludy Frank, Sapporo, 1920s
      • 2.7. Saint Joseph International College, ca. 1935
      • 2.8. Hugo, Louis, Amy, and Ludy Frank, Kamakura, 1934
      • 2.9. Louis Frank in his laboratory, Kōfu, 1938
      • 2.10. Arvid Balk, 1934
      • 2.11. Marie-Elise and Max Pestalozzi, ca. 1943
      • 2.12. Downtown Karuizawa, Taishō period
      • 3.1. Wilfrid Fleisher with Foreign Minister Matsuoka Y&omcar;suke
      • 4.1. Kondō Hidezō, “Sei-Jigoku” (Living hell), 1941
      • 6.1. The Hugo Frank family at the Fujiya Hotel in Gora, summer 1944
      • 6.2. The Haar family with maids in Karuizawa, June 1944
      • 6.3. The Haars at nursery school in Karuizawa, August 1944
      • 7.1. ICRC representatives Fritz Paravicini and Max Pestalozzi inspecting a camp in Ōmori
      • 9.1. Yasumoto Ryōichi, Amerika no baai: Kari dasareru kurowashi (In America: Black eagles sent off to hunt), 1943
      • 9.2. Yasumoto Ryōichi, Makoto ni kami wo osorezaru mono (Really, these guys don’t scare God), 1943
      • 9.3. Kondō Hidezō, Kami ikari (God’s wrath), 1944

From Our Blog

Jacket: Awakening: How Gays and Lesbians Brought Marriage Equality to America, by Nathaniel Frank, from Harvard University Press

Celebrating Pride Month

To celebrate Pride Month, we are highlighting excerpts from books that explore the lives and experiences of the LGBT+ community. Nathaniel Frank’s Awakening: How Gays and Lesbians Brought Marriage Equality to America tells the dramatic story of the struggle for same-sex couples to legally marry, something that is now taken for granted. Below, he describes the beginnings of the gay rights movement. For homophiles of the 1950s, identifying as gay was almost always a risky and radical act