Cover: Third Thoughts, from Harvard University PressCover: Third Thoughts in HARDCOVER

Third Thoughts

  • Preface
  • I. Science History
    • 1. The Uses of Astronomy
    • 2. The Art of Discovery
    • 3. From Rutherford to the LHC
    • 4. Educators and Academics, Underground in Texas
    • 5. The Rise of the Standard Models
    • 6. Long Times and Short Times
    • 7. Keeping an Eye on the Present—Whig History of Science
    • 8. The Whig History of Science: An Exchange
  • II. Physics and Cosmology
    • 9. What Is an Elementary Particle?
    • 10. The Universe We Still Don’t Know
    • 11. Varieties of Symmetry
    • 12. The Higgs, and Beyond
    • 13. Why the Higgs?
    • 14. The Trouble with Quantum Mechanics
  • III. Public Matters
    • 15. Obama Gets Space Funding Right
    • 16. The Crisis of Big Science
    • 17. Liberal Disappointment
    • 18. Keep Loopholes Open
    • 19. Against Manned Space Flight
    • 20. Skeptics and Scientists
  • IV. Personal Matters
    • 21. Change Course
    • 22. Writing about Science
    • 23. On Being Wrong
    • 24. The Craft of Science, and the Craft of Art
    • 25. New York to Austin, and Return
  • Sources
  • Index

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Awards & Accolades

  • Steven Weinberg Is Winner of the 1979 Nobel Prize in Physics
Poems of the First Buddhist Women: A Translation of the Therigatha, translated by Charles Hallisey, from Harvard University Press

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Jacket: Awakening: How Gays and Lesbians Brought Marriage Equality to America, by Nathaniel Frank, from Harvard University Press

Celebrating Pride Month

To celebrate Pride Month, we are highlighting excerpts from books that explore the lives and experiences of the LGBT+ community. Nathaniel Frank’s Awakening: How Gays and Lesbians Brought Marriage Equality to America tells the dramatic story of the struggle for same-sex couples to legally marry, something that is now taken for granted. Below, he describes the beginnings of the gay rights movement. For homophiles of the 1950s, identifying as gay was almost always a risky and radical act