Cover: Cold War Democracy: The United States and Japan, from Harvard University PressCover: Cold War Democracy in HARDCOVER

Cold War Democracy

The United States and Japan

Add to Cart

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$46.50 • £37.95 • €42.00

ISBN 9780674976344

Publication Date: 04/01/2019

Text

368 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

12 photos

World

Exhaustively researched and incisively written, Miller’s book is a model of historical scholarship that will be essential reading for scholars and students of 1950s Japan and broader United States–Japan relations.—Nick Kapur, Diplomatic History

[An] impressive book. Miller’s original thesis, her prodigious research, and her ability to connect her topic to the broader international setting and move its focus from grass roots organizing to high policy will make Cold War Democracy the standard treatment on this important but relatively neglected period in the U.S.–Japan relationship.—Marc Gallicchio, Passport

By far one of the best books on nation building and democratization…superbly written.Choice

Cold War Democracy may sound like a contradiction in terms. But as Miller’s nuanced, deeply researched interpretation of postwar relations between the United States and Japan shows, ‘democracy’ provided a flexible vocabulary for both architects and critics of this rapprochement. An innovative study of one of the most durable and significant relationships to have shaped the world since 1945.—Susan L. Carruthers, author of The Good Occupation: American Soldiers and the Hazards of Peace

How could the Cold War United States, so publicly and noisily committed to democracy, have supported repression and curbs on free speech while attacking others’ allegedly pernicious neutralism? Using U.S. relations with Japan as her case study, Miller explores this seeming paradox with great insight and deep research, including Japanese-language sources. This is a superb book with big ambitions, fully realized.—Andrew Rotter, author of Hiroshima: The World’s Bomb

In this book Miller deftly examines the ideological core of the Japanese–American relationship during the Cold War and shows how it continues to shape international relations to this day. With subtlety she explores the contested and paradoxical meanings of democracy whereby order, unity, stability, spiritual renewal, economic growth, and geopolitical power often subsumed and eclipsed concerns for freedom, equality, individual rights, and peace. This is a book that inspires deep thinking about what democracy-promotion has meant and should mean.—Melvyn P. Leffler, author of Safeguarding Democratic Capitalism: U.S. Foreign Policy and National Security, 1920–2015

Cold War Democracy is a stellar book. Relying on a treasure trove of English- and Japanese-language sources, Miller elucidates the complex—and oftentimes contentious—interplay of politicians, policymakers, intellectuals, labor activists, and grassroots protestors as they shaped a new transpacific relationship after World War II. Anyone interested in diplomatic and international history will gain a lot from this fascinating study.—Hiroshi Kitamura, author of Screening Enlightenment: Hollywood and the Cultural Reconstruction of Defeated Japan

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene