Cover: Why They Marched: Untold Stories of the Women Who Fought for the Right to Vote, from Harvard University PressCover: Why They Marched in HARDCOVER

Why They Marched

Untold Stories of the Women Who Fought for the Right to Vote

  • Prologue: A Walk through Suffrage History
  • I. Claiming Citizenship
    • 1. The Trial of Susan B. Anthony and the “Rochester Fifteen”
    • 2. Sojourner Truth Speaks Truth to Power
    • 3. Sister-Wives and Suffragists
    • 4. Alice Stone Blackwell and the Armenian Crisis of the 1890s
    • 5. Charlotte Perkins Gilman Finds Her Voice
  • II. The Personal Is Political
    • 6. The Shadow of the Confederacy
    • 7. Ida Wells-Barnett and the Alpha Suffrage Club
    • 8. Two Sisters
    • 9. Claiborne Catlin’s Suffrage Pilgrimage
    • 10. “How It Feels to Be the Husband of a Suffragette”
    • 11. The Farmer-Suffragettes
    • 12. Suffragists Abroad
  • III. Winning Strategies
    • 13. Mountaineering for Suffrage
    • 14. Hazel MacKaye and the “Allegory” of Woman Suffrage
    • 15. “Bread and Roses” and Votes for Women Too
    • 16. Cartooning with a Feminist Twist
    • 17. Jailed for Freedom
    • 18. Maud Wood Park and the Front Door Lobby
    • 19. Tennessee’s “Perfect 36”
  • Epilogue: “Leaving All to Younger Hands”
  • Notes
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene