PROCEEDINGS OF THE HARVARD CELTIC COLLOQUIUM
Cover: Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 37: 2017, from Harvard University PressCover: Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 37: 2017 in HARDCOVER

Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 37: 2017

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$32.95 • £26.95 • €29.50

ISBN 9780674987807

Publication Date: 06/04/2019

Text

308 pages

5-3/4 x 8-3/8 inches

2 halftones, 2 line illustrations, 2 maps, 4 tables

Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium

World

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This volume of the Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium offers a wide range of articles on topics across the field of Celtic Studies.

It includes the 2017 J. V. Kelleher lecture delivered by Paul Russell, Professor of Celtic, University of Cambridge, entitled “‘Mistakes of All Kinds’: The Glossography of Medieval Irish Literary Texts.” In this address Russell offers cogent analysis of this rarely addressed facet of medieval Irish codicology. The articles from other presentations at the Colloquium extend the focus on Celtic glossing into other areas of Celtic linguistics and literary studies. In addition, the volume includes articles on the medieval folkloric, religious, legal, and material culture of Celtic communities, some aspects of which persist into modernity. This volume exemplifies the broad range of topics and time periods characteristic of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium.

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene