HARVARD HISTORICAL STUDIES
Cover: News from Germany: The Competition to Control World Communications, 1900–1945, from Harvard University PressCover: News from Germany in HARDCOVER

Harvard Historical Studies 190

News from Germany

The Competition to Control World Communications, 1900–1945

  • Introduction
  • 1. The News Agency Consensus
  • 2. A World Wireless Network
  • 3. Revolution, Representation, and Reality
  • 4. The Father of Radio and Economic News in Europe
  • 5. Cultural Diplomacy in Istanbul
  • 6. False News and Economic Nationalism
  • 7. The Limits of Communications
  • 8. The World War of Words
  • Conclusion
  • List of Abbreviations
  • Notes
  • Archives Consulted
  • List of Figures*
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index
  • * Figures
    • Figure 1. Kladderadatsch Cartoon, March 31, 1917
    • Figure 2. Map of Wolff’s Branches in Germany, Zeitungswissenschaft, 1926
    • Figure 3. Simplicissimus Cartoon, September 22, 1914
    • Figure 4. U.S. Newspapers Printing Transocean Articles, 1915–1917
    • Figure 5. Kölnische Zeitung, Evening Edition, November 9, 1918
    • Figure 6. Berliner Tageblatt, Evening Edition, November 9, 1918
    • Figure 7. Kladderadatsch Cartoon, March 28, 1920
    • Figure 8. Telegraph Union Advertisement, Zeitungs-Verlag, September 5, 1924
    • Figure 9. Telegraph Union Advertisement, Zeitungs-Verlag, October 10, 1924
    • Figure 10. Telegraph Union Advertisement, Zeitungs-Verlag, February 16, 1929
    • Figure 11. Telegraph Union Advertisement, Deutsche Presse, May 24, 1930
    • Figure 12. Map of Transocean Services, 1933
    • Figure 13. French Wireless Tower in Buenos Aires, 1933

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