LOEB CLASSICAL LIBRARY
Cover: Hymns and Epigrams. Lycophron: Alexandra. Aratus: Phaenomena, from Harvard University PressCover: Hymns and Epigrams. Lycophron: Alexandra. Aratus: Phaenomena in HARDCOVER

Loeb Classical Library 129

Hymns and Epigrams. Lycophron: Alexandra. Aratus: Phaenomena

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$28.00 • £19.95 • €25.00

ISBN 9780674991439

Publication Date: 01/01/1921

Loeb

496 pages

4-1/4 x 6-3/8 inches

2 star maps, index

Loeb Classical Library

World

The digital Loeb Classical Library extends the founding mission of James Loeb with an interconnected, fully searchable, perpetually growing virtual library of all that is important in Greek and Latin literature. Read more about the site’s features »

Callimachus of Cyrene, third century BCE, became after 284 a teacher of grammar and poetry at Alexandria. He was made a librarian in the new library there and prepared a catalogue of its books. He died about 240 BCE. Of his large published output, only 6 hymns, 63 epigrams, and fragments (in Loeb Classical Library no. 421) survive. The hymns are very learned and artificial in style; the epigrams are good (they are also in the Loeb Greek Anthology volumes).

Lycophron of Chalcis in Euboea was a contemporary of Callimachus in Alexandria where he became supervisor of the comedies included in the new library. He wrote a treatise on these and composed tragedies and other poetry. We possess Alexandra or Cassandra, wherein Cassandra foretells the fortune of Troy and the besieging Greeks. This poem is a curiosity—a showpiece of knowledge of obscure stories, names, and words.

Aratus of Soli in Cilicia, ca. 315–245 BCE, was a didactic poet at the court of Antigonus Gonatas of Macedonia, where he wrote his famous astronomical poem Phaenomena (Appearances). He was for a time in the court of Antiochus I of Syria but returned to Macedonia. Phaenomena was highly regarded in antiquity; it was translated into Latin by Cicero, Germanicus Caesar, and Avienus.

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