LOEB CLASSICAL LIBRARY
Cover: Select Papyri, Volume I: Private Documents, from Harvard University PressCover: Select Papyri, Volume I: Private Documents in HARDCOVER

Loeb Classical Library 266

Select Papyri, Volume I: Private Documents

Translated by A. S. Hunt

C. C. Edgar

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$28.00 • £19.95 • €25.00

ISBN 9780674992948

Publication Date: 01/01/1932

Loeb

480 pages

4-1/4 x 6-3/8 inches

Indexes

Loeb Classical Library > Select Papyri

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This is the first of two volumes giving a selection of Greek papyri relating to private and public business. They cover a period from before 300 BCE to the eighth century CE. Most were found in rubbish heaps or remains of ancient houses or in tombs in Egypt. From such papyri we get much information about administration and social and economic conditions in Egypt, and about native Egyptian, Greek, Roman and Byzantine law, as well as glimpses of ordinary life.

This volume contains:

  • Agreements (71 examples); these concern marriage, divorce, adoption, apprenticeship, sales, leases, employment of labourers.
  • Receipts (10).
  • Wills (6).
  • Deed of disownment.
  • Personal letters from men and women, young and old (82).
  • Memoranda (2).
  • Invitations (5).
  • Orders for payment (2).
  • Agenda (2).
  • Accounts and inventories (12).
  • Questions of oracles (3).
  • Christian prayers (2).
  • A Gnostic charm.
  • Horoscopes (2).

The three-volume Loeb Classical Library edition of Select Papyri also includes a volume of poetry.

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