LOEB CLASSICAL LIBRARY
Cover: Remains of Old Latin, Volume III: Lucilius. The Twelve Tables, from Harvard University PressCover: Remains of Old Latin, Volume III: Lucilius. The Twelve Tables in HARDCOVER

Loeb Classical Library 329

Remains of Old Latin, Volume III: Lucilius. The Twelve Tables

Translated by E. H. Warmington

Lucilius

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$28.00 • £19.95 • €25.00

ISBN 9780674993631

Publication Date: 01/01/1938

Loeb

592 pages

4-1/4 x 6-3/8 inches

Index

Loeb Classical Library > Remains of Old Latin

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The digital Loeb Classical Library extends the founding mission of James Loeb with an interconnected, fully searchable, perpetually growing virtual library of all that is important in Greek and Latin literature. Read more about the site’s features »

The Loeb Classical Library edition of early Latin writings is in four volumes. The first three contain the extant work of seven poets and surviving portions of the Twelve Tables of Roman law. The fourth volume contains inscriptions on various materials (including coins), all written before 79 BCE.

Volume I: Q. Ennius (239–169) of Rudiae (Rugge), author of a great epic (Annales), tragedies and other plays, and satire and other works; Caecilius Statius (ca. 220–ca. 166), a Celt probably of Mediolanum (Milano) in N. Italy, author of comedies.

Volume II: L. Livius Andronicus (ca. 284–204) of Tarentum (Taranto), author of tragedies, comedies, a translation and paraphrase of Homer’s Odyssey, and hymns; Cn. Naevius (ca. 270–ca. 200), probably of Rome, author of an epic on the First Punic War, comedies, tragedies, and historical plays; M. Pacuvius (ca. 220–ca. 131) of Brundisium (Brindisi), a painter and later an author of tragedies, a historical play and satire; L. Accius (170–ca. 85) of Pisaurum (Pisaro), author of tragedies, historical plays, stage history and practice, and some other works; fragments of tragedies by authors unnamed.

Volume III: C. Lucilius (180?–102/1) of Suessa Aurunca (Sessa), writer of satire; The Twelve Tables of Roman law, traditionally of 451–450.

Volume IV: Archaic Inscriptions: Epitaphs, dedicatory and honorary inscriptions, inscriptions on and concerning public works, on movable articles, on coins; laws and other documents.

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