LOEB CLASSICAL LIBRARY
Cover: History of Rome, Volume XII: Books 40-42, from Harvard University PressCover: History of Rome, Volume XII in HARDCOVER

Loeb Classical Library 332

History of Rome, Volume XII

Books 40-42

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$28.00 • £19.95 • €25.00

ISBN 9780674993662

Publication Date: 01/01/1938

Loeb

544 pages

4-1/4 x 6-3/8 inches

4 maps, index

Loeb Classical Library > History of Rome

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The digital Loeb Classical Library extends the founding mission of James Loeb with an interconnected, fully searchable, perpetually growing virtual library of all that is important in Greek and Latin literature. Read more about the site’s features »

Livy (Titus Livius), the great Roman historian, was born at or near Patavium (Padua) in 64 or 59 BCE; he may have lived mostly in Rome but died at Patavium, in 12 or 17 CE.

Livy’s only extant work is part of his history of Rome from the foundation of the city to 9 BCE. Of its 142 books, we have just 35, and short summaries of all the rest except two. The whole work was, long after his death, divided into “decades” or series of ten. Books 1–10 we have entire; books 11–20 are lost; and books 21–45 are entire, except parts of 41 and 43–45. Of the rest only fragments and the summaries remain. In splendid style, Livy—a man of wide sympathies and proud of Rome’s past—presented an uncritical but clear and living narrative of the rise of Rome to greatness.

The Loeb Classical Library edition of Livy is in fourteen volumes. The last volume includes a comprehensive index.

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