LOEB CLASSICAL LIBRARY
Cover: Library of History, Volume VIII: Books 16.66-17, from Harvard University PressCover: Library of History, Volume VIII in HARDCOVER

Loeb Classical Library 422

Library of History, Volume VIII

Books 16.66-17

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$28.00 • £19.95 • €25.00

ISBN 9780674994645

Publication Date: 01/01/1963

Loeb

496 pages

4-1/4 x 6-3/8 inches

2 maps, index

Loeb Classical Library > Library of History

World

The digital Loeb Classical Library extends the founding mission of James Loeb with an interconnected, fully searchable, perpetually growing virtual library of all that is important in Greek and Latin literature. Read more about the site’s features »

Diodorus Siculus, Greek historian of Agyrium in Sicily, ca. 80–20 BCE, wrote forty books of world history, called Library of History, in three parts: mythical history of peoples, non-Greek and Greek, to the Trojan War; history to Alexander’s death (323 BCE); and history to 54 BCE. Of this we have complete Books 1–5 (Egyptians, Assyrians, Ethiopians, Greeks); Books 11–20 (Greek history 480–302 BCE); and fragments of the rest. He was an uncritical compiler, but used good sources and reproduced them faithfully. He is valuable for details unrecorded elsewhere, and as evidence for works now lost, especially writings of Ephorus, Apollodorus, Agatharchides, Philistus, and Timaeus.

The Loeb Classical Library edition of Diodorus Siculus is in twelve volumes.

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