LOEB CLASSICAL LIBRARY
Cover: Letters to Atticus, Volume II, from Harvard University PressCover: Letters to Atticus, Volume II in HARDCOVER

Cicero Volume XXIII
Loeb Classical Library 8

Letters to Atticus, Volume II

Cicero

Edited and translated by D. R. Shackleton Bailey

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$28.00 • £19.95 • €25.00

ISBN 9780674995727

Publication Date: 04/30/1999

Loeb

352 pages

4-1/4 x 6-3/8 inches

Loeb Classical Library > Cicero > Letters > Letters to Atticus

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The digital Loeb Classical Library extends the founding mission of James Loeb with an interconnected, fully searchable, perpetually growing virtual library of all that is important in Greek and Latin literature. Read more about the site’s features »

In letters to his dear friend Atticus, Cicero reveals himself as to no other of his correspondents except, perhaps, his brother. These letters, in this four-volume series, also provide a vivid picture of a momentous period in Roman history—years marked by the rise of Julius Caesar and the downfall of the Republic.

When the correspondence begins in November 68 BCE, the 38-year-old Cicero is a notable figure in Rome: a brilliant lawyer and orator, who has achieved primacy at the Roman bar and a political career that would culminate in the Consulship in 63. Over the next twenty-four years—to November 44, a year before he was put to death by the forces of Octavian and Mark Antony—Cicero wrote frequently to his friend and confidant, sharing news and discussing affairs of business and state. It is to this corpus of over 400 letters that we owe most of our information about Cicero’s literary activity. And taken as a whole, the letters provide a first-hand account of social and political life in Rome.

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