PAPERS OF THE PEABODY MUSEUM
Cover: The Social Lives of Figurines: Recontextualizing the Third-Millennium-BC Terracotta Figurines from Harappa, from Harvard University PressCover: The Social Lives of Figurines in MIXED MEDIA

Papers of the Peabody Museum 86

The Social Lives of Figurines

Recontextualizing the Third-Millennium-BC Terracotta Figurines from Harappa

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Product Details

MIXED MEDIA

$85.00 • £61.95 • €76.50

ISBN 9780873652155

Publication Date: 02/20/2017

Text

362 pages

7-3/4 X 10-5/8 inches

789 color illustrations, 10 line illustrations, 3 maps, 13 tables, CD-ROM

Peabody Museum Press > Papers of the Peabody Museum

World

  • [List of] Figures
  • [List of] Tables
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1. Introduction
    • 1.A. The Harappan Terracotta Figurines
    • 1.B. The “Social Lives” of Figurines
    • 1.C. A Brief History of the Indus Civilization
    • 1.D. Figurines and Archaeological Interpretation
    • 1.E. The Study of the Harappan Terracotta Figurines in the Context of Figurine Studies in South Asia and around the World
  • 2. Materials and Methodology
    • 2.A. Theoretical Considerations
    • 2.B. Data Collection Strategy
  • 3. Manufacturing Meaning
    • 3.A. “Re-Constructing” the Terracotta Figurines
    • 3.B. The Implications of Clay as a Medium
    • 3.C. Hand Modeling versus Molding and Mass Production
    • 3.D. Types of Figurine Forms and Production Estimates from Harappa
    • 3.E. Radiographic and Other Analyses Related to Construction
    • 3.F. Analysis of Pigments from Harappa
    • 3.G. Who Made the Indus Terracotta Figurines from Harappa?
    • 3.H. Interpreting the Construction of the Terracotta Figurines from Harappa
  • 4. Embodying Indus Life: Social Difference and Daily Life at Harappa
    • 4.A. Embodying Indus Life in the Anthropomorphic Figurines from Harappa
    • 4.B. Embodying Indus Life in the Zoomorphic Figurines from Harappa
    • 4.C. Embodying Indus Life: Depicting Difference and Society at Harappa
  • 5. A Provisional Chronological Typology for Figurines from Harappa
    • 5.A. Introduction for the Provisional Chronological Typology
    • 5.B. Period 1 (Ravi Phase, ca. 3300–2800 BC) Figurines from Harappa
    • 5.C. Period 2 (Kot Diji Phase, ca. 2800–2600 BC) Figurines from Harappa
    • 5.D. Period 3 (Harappa Phase, ca. 2600–1900 BC) Figurines from Harappa
    • 5.E. Periods 4/5 (Transitional/Late Harappa Phase, ca. 1900–1300 BC) Figurines from Harappa
    • 5.F. Post-Indus (ca. 1300–300 BC) and Historic (ca. <300 BC) Figurines from Harappa
    • 5.G. Chronological Trends and Connections
  • 6. The Figurines and Religion in the Indus Civilization: The View from Harappa
    • 6.A. Cultic Interpretation in Archaeology
    • 6.B. The Indus Civilization as a Source of Later Religious Traditions
    • 6.C. In Search of “The Mother Goddess”
    • 6.D. Other Hindu Analogies
    • 6.E. The Figurines and Cult, Magic and Shamanism at Harappa
  • 7. Concluding Remarks
    • 7.A. Significance and Contributions of This Research
    • 7.B. The Indus “Veneer” and Indigenous Regional Traditions
    • 7.C. Directions for Future Research
  • Notes
  • References
  • Appendices (on enclosed disc)
    • A. Attributes of Functional Classes and Associated Predicted Patterns of Wear, Damage, and Disposition Based on Ethnographic and Ethnohistorical Sources for Figures and Figurines
    • B. Preliminary Catalog of Figurines from Harappa (by Storage Location)
    • C. Iconographic Database Layout for Attribute Analysis
    • D. Terracotta Figurine Ritual Additive Chromatography Experiment
    • E. Analytical Report: FT-IR and Gas Chromatography Analyses of Pigment Samples from Harappa Terracotta Figurines
    • F. Provisional Chronological Typology for the Terracotta Figurines from Harappa

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