AMERICAN SCHOOL OF PREHISTORIC RESEARCH BULLETINS
Cover: Origins of the Bronze Age Oasis Civilization in Central Asia in PAPERBACK

American School of Prehistoric Research Bulletins 42

Origins of the Bronze Age Oasis Civilization in Central Asia

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PAPERBACK

$45.00 • £36.95 • €40.50

ISBN 9780873655453

Publication Date: 11/28/1994

Short

240 pages

4 maps, 54 halftones, 132 illustrations

Peabody Museum Press > American School of Prehistoric Research Bulletins

World, subsidiary rights restricted

  • List of Figures
  • List of Tables
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Note on Translations and Transliterations
  • Introduction
  • 1. Region of Study
    • Physical Environment
      • The Oasis
      • Natural Delta Environment
      • Clayey Basins (Takyr)
      • Deserts
      • Rivers
      • Foothill Plains and Mountains
    • Paleoclimate
    • Cultural Geography
      • Margiana
      • Oases Settlements
      • Foothill Settlements
      • Mountain Valley Settlements
      • Contact Areas outside of Central Asia
  • 2. Bronze Age Sites of Margiana
    • Northern Sites
      • Kelleli 4
      • Kelleli 3
    • Southern Sites
      • Togolok 21
      • Togolok 1
      • Togolok 24
    • Eastern Sites
      • Gonur depe
    • Site Distribution
  • 3. Stratigraphic Excavations at Gonur
    • Deep Sounding on Gonur North
      • Description of the Excavation and Deposits
      • Method of Excavation
    • The Stratigraphy
      • Layers 1 and 2
      • Layers 3 and 4
      • Layer 5
      • Layer 6
      • Layer 7: Surface
    • Ceramics and Small Finds
      • Period 1
      • Period 2
  • 4. Relative Chronology and Ceramics of Margiana
    • Classification of Margiana Ceramics
      • Small Vessels
      • Thin-Walled Vessels
      • Large Vessels with Thick Shoulders
      • Large Storage and Production Vessels
      • Podstavki
      • Platters
      • Cylindrical Ceramics
    • Surface Treatment
      • Painted and Incised Designs
      • Potter’s Marks
      • Seal Impressions
    • Coarseware Ceramics
    • Discussion
      • Period 1
      • Period 2
      • Takhirbai Period
      • Geomagnetic Dating
    • Conclusions
  • 5. Absolute Chronology and Radiocarbon Dates
    • New Radiocarbon Dates
      • Period 1
      • Period 2
      • Period 3
      • Data Not Used
      • Interpretation
    • Parallels
      • The Foothill Zone
      • Northern and Southern Bactria
      • Eastern Bactria: Shortughai
      • South Asia
      • Iranian Plateau
    • Conclusions
  • 6. The Earliest Architecture at Gonur Depe
    • Bronze Age House
      • Room 1
      • Room 2
      • Room 3
      • Court A
    • Surrounding Rooms
      • Rooms 4 and 5
      • Room 8
      • Room 9
    • Ceramics
    • Stratigraphy below Architecture
    • Other Architecture on the North Mound
    • Architectural Comparison
    • Earliest Monumental Architecture at Gonur
      • Stratigraphy and Phasing
      • Exterior Corridor
      • Interior Corridor
      • Courtyard and Adjacent Rooms (13 through 18)
      • Rooms 1 through 18
    • Architectural Parallels
    • Conclusions
  • 7. The Period 2 (BMAC) Architecture
    • Methods of Excavations
    • Stratigraphy
      • The First Architectural Phase: The Original Construction
      • Phase 2
      • Phase 3
      • Phase 4: BMAC Burials and Cenotaphs
      • Phase 5: Central Building
      • Relative Dating
    • The Exterior Wall
    • Collaborative Excavations at Row 2
      • Phase 1: Domestic Architecture
      • Phases 2 and 3
    • North Side
      • Kelli
      • Excavation of a Kelli
      • Architecture South of the Kelli
    • Northeast Side
      • Phase 2: Domestic Architecture
      • Comments Concerning Domestic Architecture
    • West Side, Rows 3 through 8
      • Phase 1
      • Phases 2 and 3
      • Plastered Baskets and Vessels
      • Plaster
      • Kilns
      • Fire Pits
      • Semifinished Artifacts
      • Burials and Cenotaphs (Phase 4)
    • Conclusions
  • 8. The Domestic Economy of Gonur
    • The Paleoethnobotanical Record
      • Cultivated Plants
      • Field Weeds
      • Fuel
    • Faunal Remains
      • Wild Animal Exploitation
      • Domestic Animals
      • Two Types of Bronze Age Pastoralists
    • Conclusions
  • 9. The Development of the BMAC
    • Locally Available Materials
      • Terracotta
      • Bone Objects
    • Imported Materials
      • Stone
      • Metal
    • The Bactrian-Margiana Archaeological Complex
      • Production
      • Culture Contact
      • Indigenous Development
  • 10. Trends and Traditions in Central Asian Culture History
    • The Chronology Presented in This Study
    • Establishment of the Central Asian Pattern
      • Traditions of Central Asian Motifs
      • Early Oasis Adaptations
    • Origins of the Central Asian Bronze Age Tradition
      • The Central Asian Bronze Age Ceramic Tradition
    • The Mature Bronze Age of Central Asia
      • Late Namazga V
      • Evidence of a Food Production Crisis?
    • Namazga VI
      • The Origins of Occupation in Margiana: Period 1 (2200–2100 BCE)
      • Colonization
      • New Agricultural Systems
      • Pioneer Architecture
    • The BMAC Oasis Culture: Period 2 (2000–1750 BCE)
      • Cultural Continuity and Transformation
      • The Qala and the Khan
      • Expansionism
    • Conclusions
  • Bibliography
  • Concordance of Figures
  • Index

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