AMERICAN SCHOOL OF PREHISTORIC RESEARCH BULLETINS
Cover: An Early Neolithic Village in the Jordan Valley, Part I: The Archaeology of Netiv Hagdud in PAPERBACK

American School of Prehistoric Research Bulletins 43

An Early Neolithic Village in the Jordan Valley, Part I: The Archaeology of Netiv Hagdud

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$50.00 • £40.95 • €45.00

ISBN 9780873655477

Publication Date: 05/21/1997

Short

280 pages

80 halftones, 43 tables, 15 maps

Peabody Museum Press > American School of Prehistoric Research Bulletins > An Early Neolithic Village in the Jordan Valley

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Related Subjects

  • 1. The Physical Environment of Netiv Hagdud [Erella Hovers]
    • Geology
      • The Samaria Hills
      • The Lower Samaria Hills
      • The Jordan Valley
    • Geomorphology
    • Climate
    • Soils
    • Vegetation
    • Fauna
      • Fish
      • Amphibians
      • Reptiles
      • Birds
      • Mammals
    • Reconstruction of the PPNA Environment
    • Bibliography
  • 2. Salibiya IX [Dahlia Enoch-Shiloh and Ofer Bar-Yosef]
    • Stratigraphy
    • Flint Industry
      • Tools
      • Debitage
      • Discussion
    • Ground Stone Objects
    • Bone Objects
    • Pendants and Beads
    • Mud Fragment
    • Human Figurine
    • A Comparison of Lithic Industries
      • Lithic Types
      • Summary
    • Conclusions
    • Bibliography
  • 3. The Excavations of Netiv Hagdud: Stratigraphy and Architectural Remains [Ofer Bar-Yosef and Avi Gopher]
    • The Architectural Remains
      • The Upper Area
      • The Deep Sounding
      • The Eastern Area
      • The Western Test Pit
    • Comments on the Stratigraphy of the Upper Area
    • Preservation, Radiocarbon Dates, and Wood Remains
    • The Nature of the Deposits in Netiv Hagdud
    • Bibliography
  • 4. The Chipped Stone Industry of Netiv Hagdud [Dani Nadel]
    • Technology
      • Raw Material: Flint Types
      • Heat Treatment
      • Cores and Debitage
      • Summary of Technology
    • Typology
      • Points
      • Awls-Borers
      • Sickle Blades
      • Bifacial Tools
      • Scrapers
      • Burins
      • Hagdud Truncations
      • Retouched and Truncated Blades
      • Microliths
      • Geometric Microliths
      • Notches and Denticulates
      • Double Tools
      • Varia
      • Used Pieces
      • Obsidian Assemblage
    • Spatial Distribution of Flint Artifacts
      • Locus Types
      • Densities of Artifacts
      • Discussion (Restricted Index)
      • Summary
    • A Note on the Khiamian
    • Acknowledgments
    • Appendices
    • Bibliography
  • 5. Ground Stone Tools and Other Stone Objects from Netiv Hagdud [Avi Gopher]
    • Methodology
    • The Ground Stone Assemblage
      • Pestles
      • Processors (Manos)
      • Bowls
      • Grinding Slabs
      • Cupholes
      • Grooved Items
      • Perforated Items
      • Polished Axes, Celts
      • Pallets
      • Elongated, Used Pebbles
      • Flaked Limestone Items
      • Hammerstones/Pounders
      • Fragments
      • Flakes
      • Varia
      • Beads and Decorative Items
    • Discussion
    • Appendix
    • Bibliography
  • 6. Miscellaneous Finds
    • 6.1. The Human Figurines from Netiv Hagdud [Ofer Bar-Yosef and Avi Gopher]
      • The Netiv Nagdud Figurines
      • Bibliography
    • 6.2. The Bone Artifacts from Netiv Hagdud [Douglas V. Campana]
      • The Bone Artifacts
        • Points on Halved Metapodial Shafts
        • Broken Undetermined Points and Point Tips
        • Small Spatulate-Tipped Objects
        • Small Perforated Object
        • Large Sparulate Implements
        • Decorative Piece
        • Varia
      • Discussion
      • Bibliography
    • 6.3. The Marine Shells from Netiv Hagdud [Daniella B. Bar-Yosef Mayer]
      • Description of Shell Finds
        • Gastropods
        • Scaphopods
        • Bivalves
      • Discussion
    • 6.4. The Obsidian Artifacts from Netiv Hagdud [Joseph Yellin]
      • Discussion
      • Acknowledgments
      • Bibliography
    • 6.5. A Note on the Perishable Finds from Netiv Hagdud [Tamar Schick]
      • Discussion
      • Bibliography
  • 7. The Human Remains from Netiv Hagdud [Anna Belfer-Cohen and Baruch Arensburg]
    • Inventory and Description of the Burials
      • Homo 2 (Grave II)
      • Homo 3 (Grave III)
      • Homo 4 (Grave III)
      • Homo 5 (Grave IV)
      • Homo 6 (Grave V)
      • Homo 7 (Grave VI)
      • Homo 8 (Grave VII)
      • Homo 9 (Grave VIII)
      • Homo 10 (Grave IX)
      • Homo 11 (Grave X)
      • Homo 12 (Grave XI)
      • Homo 13 (Grave XII)
      • Homo 14 (Grave XIII)
      • Homo 15 (Grave XIV)
      • Homo 16 (Grave XV)
      • Homo 17 (Grave XVI)
      • Homo 18 (Grave XVII)
      • Homo 18a (Grave XVII)
      • Homo 19 (Grave XVIII)
      • Homo 20 (Grave XIX)
      • Homo 21 (Grave XX)
      • Homo 21a (Grave XX)
      • Homo 22 (Grave XXI)
      • Homo 23 (Grave XXII)
      • Homo 24 (Grave XX)
      • Homo 25–Homo 27
      • Varia
    • Discussion
    • Acknowledgments
    • Bibliography
  • 8. Early Agriculture and Paleoecology of Netiv Hagdud [Mordechai B. Kislev]
    • The Plant Remains
      • Aizoaceae
      • Anacardiaceae
      • Boraginaceae
      • Caryophyllaceae
      • Chenopodiaceae
      • Compositae
      • Cruciferae
      • Fagaceae
      • Fumariaceae
      • Geraniaceae
      • Gramineae
      • Maivaceae
      • Moraceae
      • Papilionaceae
      • Plantaginaceae
      • Polygonaceae
      • Primulaceae
      • Ranuncuiaceae
      • Rosaceae
      • Verbenaceae
    • Discussion
    • Acknowledgments
    • Bibliography
  • 9. The Fauna of Netiv Hagdud: A Summary [Eitan Tchernov]
    • The Fauna
    • Discussion
    • Bibliography
  • 10. Discussion [Ofer Bar-Yosef and Avi Gopher]
    • Paleoenvironmental Considerations and the Levantine Corridor

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