CORPUS OF MAYA HIEROGLYPHIC INSCRIPTIONS
Cover: Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 9: Part 1: Piedras Negras, from Harvard University PressCover: Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 9: Part 1: Piedras Negras in PAPERBACK

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 9: Part 1: Piedras Negras

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$50.00 • £40.95 • €45.00

ISBN 9780873658225

Publication Date: 03/03/2004

Short

64 pages

51 halftones, 43 line drawings, 1 map, 1 site plan

Peabody Museum Press > Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions

World, subsidiary rights restricted

The goal of the Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

The first of five anticipated volumes on the renowned monuments of Piedras Negras, Guatemala, this volume describes the site and the history of exploration at this important center of Classic Maya civilization. It includes photographs and detailed line drawings of twelve of the inscribed sculpted monuments at Piedras Negras, as well as a map of the ruins.

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