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Byzantium and the Arabs in the Fourth Century

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HARDCOVER

$30.00 • £24.95 • €27.00

ISBN 9780884021162

Publication Date: 01/01/1984

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  • Frontispiece
  • Abbreviations
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
      • 1. The Sources
      • 2. The Problems and the Major Themes
      • 3. Byzantium and the Arabs before the Rise of Islam
      • 4. The Fourth Century: A Synoptic View
  • Part One. The Greek and the Latin Sources
    • I. The Reign of Constantine
      • 1. The Namāra Inscription
      • 2. Vita Constantini
      • 3. Constantinus Arabicus Maximus
      • 4. The Three Documents
      • 5. Constantine and the Arabs
      • 6. Appendix: The Barāqish Inscription
    • II. The Reign of Constantius
      • 1. Constantinus and the Arabs
      • 2. Constantinus and the Southern Semites
      • Appendices
        • 1. Christianity in South Arabia
        • 2. Philostorgius, HE, III.11
    • III. The Reign of Julian
      • 1. The Arabs in the Res Gestae
      • 2. The Death of Julian
      • 3. Julian and the Arabs
      • 4. Appendix: Libanius, Autobiography, Sec. 138
    • IV. The Reign of Valens
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. The Anonymous King
      • 3. The Revolt and Mavia’s Offensive
      • 4. The Roman Counteroffensive
      • 5. The Holy Man Moses
      • 6. Mavia’s Daughter
      • 7. Mavia’s Son-in-Law
      • 8. The Decade 365–75
      • 9. The Gothic War
      • Appendices
        • 1. The Chronology of Mavia’s Revolt
        • 2. Theodoret
        • 3. Moses
        • 4. Mavia’s Christianity
        • 5. Mavia’s Ethnic Origin
        • 6. On the Name “Mavia”
        • 7. Rufinus
        • 8. E. L. Woodward
    • V. The Reign of Theodosius I
      • 1. The Fall of the Tanūkhids
      • 2. The Latin Source
      • 3. The Background of the Revolt
      • 4. The Revolt
      • 5. The Aftermath of the Revolt
      • Appendices
        • 1. Libanius
        • 2. Victor’s Retirement
    • VI. Two Greek Inscriptions
      • 1. Anasartha: Martyrium Extra Muros
      • 2. Anasartha: Martyrium Intra Muros
    • VII. Two Historians: Ammianus and Sozomen
      • 1. Ammianus and the Arabs
      • 2. Ammianus and the Foederati
      • 3. Ammianus and Victor
      • 4. Sozomen on the Arabs
      • 5. On the Image of the Arabs in the Fourth Century
    • VIII. The Arab Presence in Oriens
      • 1. The Arabs in the Work of St. Jerome: Two Vitae
      • 2. St. Jerome and the Arabs
      • 3. Itinerarium Egeriae
      • 4. Ammonii Monachi Relatio
      • 5. The Authenticity of the Ammonii Monachi Relatio
      • 6. Antonini Placentiae Itinerarium
      • Appendices
        • 1. Midian
        • 2. Pharan
        • 3. On Ammonius, Procopius, and Eutychius
    • IX. Ecclesiastical History
      • 1. The Bishops of the Arab Foederati
      • Appendices
        • 1. R. Aigrain and R. Devreesse
        • 2. Barochius, Bishop of Arabia
        • 3. On the Bishops of the Arab Provincials
  • Part Two. The Arabic and Syriac Sources
    • X. Political and Military History
      • 1. Hishām al-Kalbī
      • 2. The Identity of the Fourth-Century Foederati: The Tanūkhids
      • 3. The List of Kings
      • 4. Toponymical Observations
      • Appendices
        • 1. Jabala b. Sālim
        • 2. Masʿūdī on the Tanūkhids
        • 3. Further Observations on the List of Kings
        • 4. Thainatha, Malikān, Ilāha
    • XI. Cultural History
      • 1. Tanūkh and Christianity
      • 2. The Problem of an Arabic Bible and Liturgy in Pre-Islamic Times
      • 3. Arabic Poetry in the Fourth Century A.D.
      • 4. D&imcar;wān Tanūkh
      • 5. Tanūkh post Tanūkh
      • Appendix: Tanūkh and the Byzantine Counteroffensive (A.D. 639)
    • Epilogue to Part Two
  • Part Three. Frontier and Other Studies
      • 1. The Tanūkhids and Chalcidice
      • 2. The Arabs along the Limes Orientalis
      • 3. The Etymology of Ḥīra
      • 4. The Arab Foederati of the Fourth Century
      • 5. The Basileia
      • 6. The Phylarchia
      • 7. Arabs in the Service of Byzantium
      • 8. Appendix: Th. Nöldeke on the Basileia and the Phylarchia
  • Part Four. Synthesis and Exposition
      • 1. Federate–Imperial Relations
      • 2. The Political and Military Organization of the Foederati
      • 3. The World of the Foederati in the Arabic Sources
      • 4. The Foederati and the Roman Frontier
      • 5. Federate Cultural Life
      • 6. The Arab Episcopate
      • 7. The Rise of an Arab Church
      • 8. Christianity and Arabism: Interaction and Reciprocal Influences
      • 9. The Image
  • Epilogue
  • Addenda
  • Bibliography
  • Maps
  • Index
  • Plates

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