DUMBARTON OAKS COLLOQUIUM ON THE HISTORY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
Cover: Regional Garden Design in the United States, from Harvard University PressCover: Regional Garden Design in the United States in HARDCOVER

Dumbarton Oaks Colloquium on the History of Landscape Architecture 15

Regional Garden Design in the United States

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$50.00 • £40.95 • €45.00

ISBN 9780884022237

Publication Date: 01/01/1995

Short

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Regionalism has become a much-discussed design issue for landscape architects in recent years. Increased mobility, uprootedness, and the pace of change in an increasingly technological society have contributed to interest in this concept, which places value on cultural continuity in local areas. This approach to garden design attempts to capture the spirit of the place, the plant material, and symbolic qualities that define a region’s natural and cultural character. These essays lay the foundation for examining regionalism in American garden design. The organization of the papers is by geographical area, covering the West Coast, the Midwest, the South, and New England. This volume also includes Wilhelm Miller’s seminal essay of 1915, “The Prairie Spirit in Landscape Gardening,” reprinted as an appendix. This essay, which is frequently cited but rarely seen, is often regarded as the regionalist manifesto.

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