DUMBARTON OAKS OTHER TITLES IN GARDEN HISTORY
Cover: Gardens and Cultural Change: A Pan-American Perspective, from Harvard University PressCover: Gardens and Cultural Change in PAPERBACK

Gardens and Cultural Change

A Pan-American Perspective

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$25.00 • £20.95 • €22.50

ISBN 9780884023302

Publication Date: 02/29/2008

Short

110 pages

35 black and white photographs; 37 color photographs

Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection > Dumbarton Oaks Other Titles in Garden History

World

Gardens contain time, culture, and nature. They are powerful symbolic spaces onto which a society can project its ideals, either to conjure or contrive cultural change, rooting them in the flow of natural processes. Five authors explore the variety of relationships between garden making and cultural change in Argentina, the Caribbean, Mexico, and the United States. They show how gardens express popular cultural invention and attempts at political manipulation, as well as provide places of cultural resistance by subjugated people. Issues of identity and ideology; political coercion and resistance apply equally throughout the continent, inviting a renewed attention to gardens as places where cultural identities are forged and contested.

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene