DUMBARTON OAKS PRE-COLUMBIAN SYMPOSIA AND COLLOQUIA
Cover: Tombs for the Living: Andean Mortuary Practices, from Harvard University PressCover: Tombs for the Living in PAPERBACK

Tombs for the Living

Andean Mortuary Practices

Edited by Tom D. Dillehay

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$40.00 • £32.95 • €36.00

ISBN 9780884023746

Publication Date: 11/14/2011

Text

434 pages

6 x 9 inches

45 black-and-white illustrations, 45 black-and-white photographs, 11 tables

Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection > Dumbarton Oaks Pre-Columbian Symposia and Colloquia

World

In the Andes, a long history of research on burial records and burial contexts exists for the purpose of reconstructing cultural affiliation, chronology, socioeconomic status, grave content, and human body treatment. Less attention is paid to the larger question of how mortuary practices functioned in different cultures. Tombs for the Living: Andean Mortuary Practices (originally released in 1995) examines this broader issue by looking at the mortuary practices that created a connection between the living and the dead; the role of wealth and ancestors in cosmological schemes; the location, construction, and sociopolitical implications of tombs and cemeteries; and the art and iconography of death. By examining rich sets of archaeological, ethnographic, and ethnohistoric data, the thirteen essays continue to enrich our understanding of the context and meaning of the mortuary traditions in the Andes.

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

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