DUMBARTON OAKS PRE-COLUMBIAN SYMPOSIA AND COLLOQUIA
Cover: The Art of Urbanism: How Mesoamerican Kingdoms Represented Themselves in Architecture and Imagery, from Harvard University PressCover: The Art of Urbanism in PAPERBACK

The Art of Urbanism

How Mesoamerican Kingdoms Represented Themselves in Architecture and Imagery

Add to Cart

Product Details

PAPERBACK

$35.00 • £28.95 • €31.50

ISBN 9780884023784

Publication Date: 04/02/2012

Text

488 pages

7 x 10 inches

7 color photos, 6 color illustrations, 56 black and white photos, 187 black and white illustrations, 3 maps, 5 tables

Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection > Dumbarton Oaks Pre-Columbian Symposia and Colloquia

World, subsidiary rights restricted

The Art of Urbanism explores how the royal courts of powerful Mesoamerican centers represented their kingdoms in architectural, iconographic, and cosmological terms. Through an investigation of the ecological contexts and environmental opportunities of urban centers, the contributors consider how ancient Mesoamerican cities defined themselves and reflected upon their physical—and metaphysical—place via their built environment. Themes in the volume include the ways in which a kingdom’s public monuments were fashioned to reflect geographic space, patron gods, and mythology, and how the Olmec, Maya, Mexica, Zapotecs, and others sought to center their world through architectural monuments and public art.

This collection of papers addresses how communities leveraged their environment and built upon their cultural and historical roots as well as the ways that the performance of calendrical rituals and other public events tied individuals and communities to both urban centers and hinterlands. Twenty-three scholars from archaeology, anthropology, art history, and religious studies contribute new data and new perspectives to the understanding of ancient Mesoamericans’ own view of their spectacular urban and ritual centers.

From Our Blog

Jacket: The Chinese Must Go: Violence, Exclusion, and the Making of the Alien in America, by Beth Lew-Williams, from Harvard University Press

Celebrating Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, Part II

In celebration of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, we’re showcasing titles that document the Asian American experience. Our second excerpt comes from Beth Lew-Williams’s prizewinning book The Chinese Must Go: Violence, Exclusion, and the Making of the Alien in America, which historian Richard White describes as “a powerful argument about racial violence that could not be more timely.” Monday night, Gong was asleep in his tent when the vigilantes returned