DUMBARTON OAKS PAPERS
Cover: Dumbarton Oaks Papers, 75, from Harvard University PressCover: Dumbarton Oaks Papers, 75 in HARDCOVER

Dumbarton Oaks Papers, 75

Edited by Colin M. Whiting

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$125.00 • £100.95 • €112.50

ISBN 9780884024835

Publication Date: 01/11/2022

Text

Published annually, the journal Dumbarton Oaks Papers was founded in 1941 for the publication of articles relating to Byzantine civilization.

In this issue: Margaret Mullet, “Ruth Macrides: 1949–2019”; Sihong Lin, “Justin under Justinian: The Rise of Emperor Justinian II Revisited”; David Gyllenhaal, “Πόλις ἡ Μελιτηνὴ μεγάλη καὶ πολυάνθρωπος: Byzantine Melitene and the Social Milieu of the Syriac Renaissance”; Pavel Murdzhev, “The Introduction of the Moldboard Plow in Byzantine Thrace in the Eleventh Century”; Annemarie Weyl Carr, “The Lady and the Juggler: Mary East and West”; Robert Nelson, “A Miniature Mosaic Icon of St. Demetrios in Byzantium and the Renaissance”; Esra Akin-Kivanc, “In the Mirror of the Other: Imprints of Muslim–Christian Encounters in the Late Antique and Early Medieval Mediterranean”; Anna Chrysostomides, “John of Damascus’s Theology of Icons in the Context of Eighth-Century Palestinian Iconoclasm”; Max Ritter, “The Byzantine Afterlife of Procopius’s Buildings”; Jonathan Zecher, “Myths of Aerial Tollhouses and Their Tradition from George the Monk to the Life of Basil the Younger”; Nektarios Zarras, “Illness and Healing: The Ministery Cycle in the Chora Monastery and the Literary Oeuvre of Theodore Metochites”; and Aleksandr Andreev, “The Order of the Hours in the Yaroslavl Horologion.”

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