HARVARD SERIES IN UKRAINIAN STUDIES
Cover: Ukrainian Futurism, 1914-1930: A Historical and Critical Study, from Harvard University PressCover: Ukrainian Futurism, 1914-1930 in PAPERBACK

Ukrainian Futurism, 1914-1930

A Historical and Critical Study

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$17.95 • £14.95 • €16.00

ISBN 9780916458591

Publication Date: 01/15/1998

Short

From its inception just before World War I to its demise during the Stalinist repression of Ukrainian culture in the 1930s, Ukrainian Futurism was much maligned and poorly understood. It has remained so into the late 20th century. Professor Oleh Ilnytzkyj seeks to rectify the misinterpretations surrounding the Futurists and their leader Mykhail’ Semenko, providing the first major English-language monograph on this vibrant literary movement and its charismatic leader. This study places Ukrainian Futurism within the context of other major Ukrainian literary movements of the time and examines its relationship to Russian and West European Futurism; it also includes critical analyses of the major works of the leading figures within the Ukrainian movement.

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Jacket: Ukrainian Futurism, 1914-1930

HARDCOVER | $36.95

ISBN 9780916458560

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Awards & Accolades

  • 1997–1998 AAUS Prize for Best Book, American Association for Ukrainian Studies
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