RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD
Cover: Experiences of Place in PAPERBACK

Experiences of Place

Edited by Mary N. MacDonald

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$18.95 • £15.95 • €17.00

ISBN 9780945454380

Publication Date: 04/30/2003

Short

200 pages

16 halftones, 5 maps, 1 line drawing

Center for the Study of World Religions > Religions of the World

World

Experiences of Place is a multidisciplinary, cross-cultural exploration of a common human phenomenon. This book takes a bold and important step in filling, in MacDonald’s words, ‘an underdeveloped concept of religious studies.’ This is an exciting book, full of possibilities, a most important work on the subject of place in the human imagination.—Philip P. Arnold

The meaning, activity and experience of place offer far more to the study of religions than has yet been realized. In their timely discussion of present, material locations, the fantasized places of heaven and the conspiratorial underworld, the sites of oral and textual traditions, and the places of dreaming and promise, this book’s contributors indicate some of the varied directions we might take in exploring the physical, social and cultural dimensions of place and their intersection with the religious.—Kim Knott

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