HARVARD PUBLICATIONS IN MUSIC
Cover: Music in Time: Phenomenology, Perception, Performance, from Harvard University PressCover: Music in Time in PAPERBACK

Isham Library Papers 9
Harvard Publications in Music 24

Music in Time

Phenomenology, Perception, Performance

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$39.95 • £31.95 • €36.00

ISBN 9780964031777

Publication Date: 01/06/2020

Text

352 pages

6 x 9 inches

43 illus., 5 tables

Harvard University Department of Music > Harvard Publications in Music

World

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Music exists in time. All musicians know this fundamental truth—but what does it actually mean? Thirteen scholars probe the temporality of music from a great variety of perspectives, in response to challenges that Christopher F. Hasty, Walter Naumburg Professor of Music at Harvard University, laid out in his groundbreaking Meter as Rhythm.

The essays included here bridge the conventional divides between theory, history, ethnomusicology, aesthetics, performance practice, cognitive psychology, and dance studies. In these investigations, music emerges as an art form that has an important lesson to teach. Not only can music be understood as sounds shaped in time but—more radically—as time shaped in sounds.

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

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In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene