STUDIES IN GLOBAL EQUITY
Cover: Human Resources for Health in PAPERBACK

Human Resources for Health

Overcoming the Crisis

Add to Cart

Product Details

PAPERBACK

$14.95 • £11.95 • €13.50

ISBN 9780974110875

Publication Date: 09/15/2005

Short

216 pages

26 figures, 3 maps, 28 boxed text, 6 tables

Global Equity Initiative, Harvard University > Studies in Global Equity

World

In this analysis of the global workforce, the Joint Learning Initiative, a consortium of more than 100 health leaders, proposes that mobilization and strengthening of human resources for health, neglected yet critical, is central to combating health crises in some of the world’s poorest countries and for building sustainable health systems everywhere. Worker shortage, skill mix imbalance, maldistribution, negative work environments, and weak knowledge bases challenge nearly all countries. Especially in the poorest countries, the workforce is under assault by a triple threat of HIV/AIDS, out-migration, and inadequate investment. Effective country strategies should be launched and backed by international reinforcement. These include urgently mobilizing one million more health workers for Africa, and focusing efforts on the unremunerated community-level health workers, the majority of whom are women. Ultimately, the crisis in human resources is a shared problem requiring shared responsibility for cooperative action. Alliances for action are recommended to strengthen the performance of all actors while expanding space and energy for new ones.

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket: The Cabinet: George Washington and the Creation of an American Institution, by Lindsay Chervinsky, from Harvard University Press

Why You Should Participate in an (Online) Book Club

Online book clubs can be a rewarding way to connect with readers, Lindsay Chervinsky discovered, when she was invited to join one to discuss her book, The Cabinet: George Washington and the Creation of an American Institution. Since my book was published in April 2020, I’ve discovered that my work appeals to three main audiences. First, the general readers who are enthusiastic about history, attend virtual events, and tend to support local historic sites. Second, readers who are curious about our government institutions and the current political climate and are looking for answers about its origins. And third, history, social studies, and government teachers