HOUGHTON LIBRARY PUBLICATIONS
Cover: A Monument More Durable than Brass: Donald & Mary Hyde Collection of Dr. Samuel Johnson, from Harvard University PressCover: A Monument More Durable than Brass in HARDCOVER

A Monument More Durable than Brass

Donald & Mary Hyde Collection of Dr. Samuel Johnson

Edited by Thomas A. Horrocks

To commemorate the tercentenary of the birth of Samuel Johnson (1709–1784), whose influence on his time was as monumental as his legacy is enduring, Harvard University’s Houghton Library presents this exhibition catalogue of items drawn from the Donald & Mary Hyde Collection of Dr. Samuel Johnson, bequeathed to the library in 2004 by Mary Hyde Eccles. This copiously illustrated catalogue documents sixty years of assiduous and painstaking effort on the part of Lady Eccles, initially in collaboration with her first husband, Donald F. Hyde, and later with the encouragement and support of her second husband, David, Viscount Eccles, to assemble one of the world’s finest collections of eighteenth-century English literature. The catalogue, including essays on Johnson’s literary durability and on Donald and Mary Hyde’s life as collectors, pays tribute to a great literary icon and to a remarkably generous woman who devoted her life to collecting an astonishing array of books, manuscripts, prints, and other rare artifacts relating to his life and times.

From Our Blog

Jacket: The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, by Khalil Gibran Muhammad, from Harvard University Press

“Predictive Policing” and Racial Profiling

While technology used in policing has improved, it hasn’t progressed, says Khalil Gibran Muhammad, if racial biases are built into those new technologies. This excerpt from his book, The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, shows that for the reform called for by the current protests against systemic racism and racially-biased policing to be fulfilled, the police—especially those at the top—will need to change their pre-programmed views on race and the way they see the Black citizens they are supposed to “serve and protect.”