THE CULTURAL AGENTS INITIATIVE AT HARVARD UNIVERSITY
Cover: A Singular Plurality: The Works of Dario Escobar, from Harvard University PressCover: A Singular Plurality in PAPERBACK

Focus on Latin American Art and Agency 1

A Singular Plurality

The Works of Dario Escobar

Edited by José Luis Falconi

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$49.00 • £39.95 • €44.00

ISBN 9780985739508

Publication Date: 12/08/2014

Text

384 pages

150 color photographs, 1 black and white photograph

The Cultural Agents Initiative at Harvard University > Focus on Latin American Art and Agency

World

  • Foreword [Thomas B. F. Cummins]
  • Introduction: Conscientious Objector: Objects, Non-Objects and Indexes in Darío Escobar’s Sculpture [José Luis Falconi]
  • Artist’s Dossier
  • Found
    • 1. Supermarket Carts
    • 2. Books
    • 3. Oil Spills
    • 4. Playing Cards
    • 5. Bumpers
    • 6. Skateboards
    • 7. Buckets
  • Taken
    • 1. Party Caps
    • 2. Fake Jewelry
    • 3. Gold Bling
    • 4. Camping Gear
    • 5. Silver Bling
    • 6. Skateboards
    • 7. Sports Balls Imprints
    • 8. Soccer Balls
    • 9. Bicycles
    • 10. Tennis Balls
    • 11. Basketball Hoops
    • 12. Fountain Pens
    • 13. Pencils
    • 14. Footballs
    • 15. Baseball Bats
    • 16. Sports Gear
    • 17. Stationery
  • Critical Dossier
    • At Play in the Arts of the Lord: The Early Work of Darío Escobar [Thomas B. F. Cummins]
    • Darío Escobar: Local and Glocal Disruptions [Kevin Power]
    • Interview with the Artist [Alma Ruiz]
    • Choose to Lose: Darío Escobar’s Winning Game [Doris Sommer]
    • The Sculptor of Everyday Life: Darío Escobar’s Readymade Sculptures [Christian Viveros-Fauné]
  • About the Artist
  • Notes of Contributors
  • Acknowledgments

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