HARVARD DESIGN STUDIES
Cover: Spatializing Politics: Essays on Power and Place, from Harvard University PressCover: Spatializing Politics in PAPERBACK

Spatializing Politics

Essays on Power and Place

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$24.95 • £19.95 • €22.50

ISBN 9781934510469

Publication Date: 02/15/2016

Text

432 pages

6-1/2 x 9-1/4 inches

15 black and white illustrations, 1 halftone, 9 line art, 28 color illustrations, 10 maps

Harvard Graduate School of Design > Harvard Design Studies

World

Invoking geographical theorists such as Harvey, Massey, McCann, and Soja, the level of intellectual cross-pollination is refreshing… The essays shed light on varying forms of state power and of resistance efforts in order to articulate dissent over the reconstruction of space that invariably benefits the entrenched interests driving the state… The book as a whole represents a consistent engagement with various forms of spatial politics across scales, but always reminds the reader of individual-scale processes. These chapters are well-theorized case studies, as the various theoretical underpinnings the authors leverage demonstrate their explanatory power. The collection’s strength is the varying takes on space and power, providing excellent analyses for scholars and students from geography and planning to sociology and anthropology.—Darren Purcell, Technology and Culture

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene