HARVARD DESIGN STUDIES
Cover: Airport Landscape: Urban Ecologies in the Aerial Age, from Harvard University PressCover: Airport Landscape in PAPERBACK

Airport Landscape

Urban Ecologies in the Aerial Age

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$24.95 • £19.95 • €22.50

ISBN 9781934510476

Publication Date: 04/18/2016

Text

208 pages

9 x 11-3/4 inches

76 color photographs, 65 color illustrations, 16 line illustrations, 13 halftones, 20 maps, 1 table

Harvard Graduate School of Design > Harvard Design Studies

World

Airports have never been more central to the life of cities, yet they have remained relatively peripheral in design discourse. In spite of this, however, landscape architects in recent decades have reaffirmed their historic assertions about the airfield as a site of design through a range of practices. Airport Landscape: Urban Ecologies in the Aerial Age presents these practices through case study projects for the ecological enhancement of operating airports and the conversion of abandoned airports. This material supports the claim of an augmented role for landscape architects commensurate with their desire to be considered urbanists of the aerial age. The book gathers work from the eponymous exhibition that was held at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, presenting the airport as a site of and for landscape.

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