The Jerusalem-Harvard Lectures

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

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Cover: Actual Minds, Possible Worlds

Actual Minds, Possible Worlds

Bruner, Jerome

In this characteristically graceful and provocative book, Jerome Bruner, one of the principal architects of the cognitive revolution, sets forth nothing less than a new agenda for the study of the mind. Bruner examines the irrepressibly human acts of imagination that allow us to make experience meaningful; he calls this side of mental activity the “narrative mode,” and his book makes important advances in the effort to unravel its nature.

Cover: Time’s Arrow, Time’s Cycle: Myth and Metaphor in the Discovery of Geological Time

Time’s Arrow, Time’s Cycle: Myth and Metaphor in the Discovery of Geological Time

Gould, Stephen Jay

Stephen Jay Gould’s subject is nothing less than geology’s signal contribution to human thought—the discovery of “deep time,” the vastness of earth’s history, a history so ancient that we can comprehend it only as metaphor.

Cover: After the Fact: Two Countries, Four Decades, One Anthropologist

After the Fact: Two Countries, Four Decades, One Anthropologist

Geertz, Clifford

In looking back on four decades of anthropology in the field, Clifford Geertz creates a personal history that is also a retrospective reflection on developments in the human sciences amid political, social, and cultural changes in the world.

Cover: A Pitch of Philosophy: Autobiographical Exercises

A Pitch of Philosophy: Autobiographical Exercises

Cavell, Stanley

This book is an invitation to the life of philosophy in the United States, as Emerson once lived it and as Stanley Cavell now lives it—in all its topographical ambiguity.

Cover: Imagined Worlds

Imagined Worlds

Dyson, Freeman

Dyson shows us where science and technology, real and imagined, may be taking us. The stories he tells—about “Napoleonic” versus “Tolstoyan” styles of doing science, the coming era of radioneurology and radiotelepathy, the works of writers from Aldous Huxley to Michael Crichton to William Blake—come from science, science fiction, and history.

Cover: How to Win the Nobel Prize: An Unexpected Life in Science

How to Win the Nobel Prize: An Unexpected Life in Science

Bishop, J. Michael

In 1989 Michael Bishop and Harold Varmus were awarded the Nobel Prize for their discovery that normal genes under certain conditions can cause cancer. In this book, Bishop tells us how he and Varmus made their momentous discovery.

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Talk Radio’s America: How an Industry Took Over a Political Party That Took Over the United States, by Brian Rosenwald, from Harvard University Press

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