Studies in Cultural History

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

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Cover: When Fathers Ruled: Family Life in Reformation Europe

When Fathers Ruled: Family Life in Reformation Europe

Ozment, Steven

Here is a lively study of marriage and the family during the Reformation, primarily in Gemany and Switzerland, that dispels the commonly held notion of fathers as tyrannical and families as loveless.

Cover: France, Fin de Siècle

France, Fin de Siècle

Weber, Eugen

The end of the nineteenth century in France was marked by political scandals, social unrest, dissension, and “decadence,” yet also by great social and scientific progress. In this thoroughly engaging history, Weber describes ways of life, not as recorded by general history, but as contemporaries experienced them.

Cover: Awash in a Sea of Faith: Christianizing the American People

Awash in a Sea of Faith: Christianizing the American People

Butler, Jon

Challenging the formidable tradition that places early New England Puritanism at the center of the American religious experience, Yale historian Jon Butler offers a new interpretation of three hundred years of religious and cultural development.

Cover: When Time Shall Be No More: Prophecy Belief in Modern American Culture

When Time Shall Be No More: Prophecy Belief in Modern American Culture

Boyer, Paul

As influential as prophecy is in the worldview of so many, the belief in the phenomenon remains a popular mystery, largely unstudied and little understood. When Time Shall Be No More offers for the first time an in-depth look at the subtle, pervasive ways in which prophecy belief shapes contemporary American thought and culture.

Cover: Berlin Cabaret

Berlin Cabaret

Jelavich, Peter

Peter Jelavich spotlights Berlin’s cabarets from the day the curtain first went up, in 1901, until the Nazi regime brought it down. Fads and fashions, sexual mores, and political ideologies—all were subject to satire and parody on the cabaret stage. This book follows the changing treatment of these themes, and the fate of cabaret itself, through the most turbulent decades of German history.

Cover: On or About December 1910: Early Bloomsbury and Its Intimate World

On or About December 1910: Early Bloomsbury and Its Intimate World

Stansky, Peter

Drawing upon his historical and literary talents, Peter Stansky captures the dazzling world of early Bloomsbury. The picture he presents, with all its drama and detail, encompasses the conflicts and sureties of a changing world of politics, aesthetics, and character.

Cover: Avant-Garde Florence: From Modernism to Fascism

Avant-Garde Florence: From Modernism to Fascism

Adamson, Walter

They envisioned a brave new world, and what they got was fascism. As vibrant as its counterparts in Paris, Munich, and Milan, the avant-garde of Florence rose on a wave of artistic, political, and social idealism that swept the world with the arrival of the twentieth century. How the movement flourished in its first heady years, only to flounder in the bloody wake of World War I, is a fascinating story, told here for the first time. It is the history of a whole generation’s extraordinary promise—and equally extraordinary failure.

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Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration, by Nicole R. Fleetwood, from Harvard University Press

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Jacket, Bored, Lonely, Angry, Stupid: Changing Feelings about Technology, from the Telegraph to Twitter, by Luke Fernandez and Susan J. Matt, from Harvard University Press

Technology, Biology, Chronology

Fears and anxieties about the latest technologies are nothing new, say Luke Fernandez and Susan J. Matt, authors of Bored, Lonely, Angry, Stupid: Changing Feelings about Technology, from the Telegraph to Twitter. But neither is the fact that they often provide new ways for us to connect and socialize. Mark Twain is rumored to have said “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes.” Of late, much press has been spent on uncovering those rhymes, focusing on the similarities between the current epidemic and past ones. These stories underscore the lesson that progress hasn't allowed us to escape the suffering of earlier