Religions of the World

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

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Cover: The Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles: Harvard Divinity School Studies

The Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles: Harvard Divinity School Studies

Bovon, Fran├žois
Brock, Ann Graham
Matthews, Christopher R.

This collection provides a rich, multilayered analysis of a long-neglected branch of early Christian apocryphal literature that examines the relationship between tradition and redaction, uses of language, and the fluid border between literary criticism and motif analysis.

Cover: Ancestors in Post-Contact Religion: Roots, Ruptures, and Modernity's Memory

Ancestors in Post-Contact Religion: Roots, Ruptures, and Modernity's Memory

Friesen, Steven J.

The phenomenon of ancestors is common to all humans, but while prominent in most indigenous traditions, it has been suppressed in western cultures. This volume articulates crucial issues in the study of post-contact religion through the themes of the ancestral ordering of the world, intense personal attachments to forebears, and the catastrophes of colonization.

Cover: Experiences of Place

Experiences of Place

MacDonald, Mary N.

Place and orientation are important aspects of human experience. The distinguished contributors to this volume invite us to reflect on the significance of places, real and imagined, in the religious traditions they study and on how places are known, imagined, remembered, and struggled for.

Desperate Remedies: Psychiatry’s Turbulent Quest to Cure Mental Illness, by Andrew Scull, from Harvard University Press

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Jacket: A Brief History of Equality, by Thomas Piketty, from Harvard University Press

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