Source Books in the History of the Sciences

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

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Cover: From Frege to Gödel: A Source Book in Mathematical Logic, 1879-1931

From Frege to Gödel: A Source Book in Mathematical Logic, 1879-1931

van Heijenoort, Jean

Gathered together here are the fundamental texts of the great classical period in modern logic. A complete translation of Gottlob Frege’s Begriffsschrift—which opened a great epoch in the history of logic by fully presenting propositional calculus and quantification theory—begins the volume, which concludes with papers by Herbrand and by Gödel.

Cover: A Source Book in Medieval Science

A Source Book in Medieval Science

Grant, Edward

Cover: A Source Book in the History of Psychology

A Source Book in the History of Psychology

Herrnstein, Richard J.
Boring, Edwin G.

This is a source book unique in its scope, clarity, and general interest. Its 116 excerpts range in time from Epicurus (ca. 300 B.C.) to the turn of the present century and sometimes, when continuity requires, a little beyond (as to K. S. Lashley, 1929). It includes excerpts from Kepler (1604) on the inverted retinal image, Descartes (1650) on the soul’s interaction with the machine of the body, Newton (1675) on the seven colors of the spectrum, Locke (1700) on association of ideas, Whytt (1751) on the spinal reflex, Weber (1834) on Weber’s law, Darwin (1859) on evolution, Sechenov (1863) on reflexology, Hughlings Jackson (1884) on nervous dissolution, William James (1890) on associationism, Thorndike, Pavlov, Wertheimer, Watson, and 70 other great figures in the history of psychology.

Cover: A Source Book in Greek Science

A Source Book in Greek Science

Cohen, Morris R.
Drabkin, I. E.

Cover: A Source Book in Classical Analysis

A Source Book in Classical Analysis

Birkhoff, Garrett

This Source Book, a sequel to D. J. Struik’s Source Book in Mathematics, 1200–1800, draws together more than eighty selections from the writings of the most influential mathematicians of the period. Thirteen chapters, each with an introduction by the editor, highlight the major developments in mathematical thinking over the century.

Cover: A Source Book in Geography

A Source Book in Geography

Kish, George

Cover: A Source Book in Physics

A Source Book in Physics

Magie, William Francis

Cover: Source Book in Astronomy, 1900–1950

Source Book in Astronomy, 1900–1950

Shapley, Harlow

The Source Book’s 69 contributions represent all fields of astronomy. For example, there are reports on the equivalence of mass and energy (E = mc²) of the special theory of relativity; building the 200-inch Palomar telescope; the scattering of galaxies suggesting a rapidly expanding universe; stellar evolution; and the Big Bang and Steady State theories of the universe’s origin.

Cover: A Source Book in Geology, 1900–1950

A Source Book in Geology, 1900–1950

Mather, Kirtley F.

Cover: A Source Book in Chemistry, 1400-1900

A Source Book in Chemistry, 1400-1900

Leicester, Henry M.
Klickstein, Herbert S.

Cover: A Source Book in Astronomy and Astrophysics, 1900–1975

A Source Book in Astronomy and Astrophysics, 1900–1975

Lang, Kenneth
Gingerich, Owen

Cover: A Source Book in Animal Biology

A Source Book in Animal Biology

Hall, Thomas S.

The two main aims of this book are to increase the general availability of classical contributions to animal biology and to present the development of thought in this field in the words of those who produced it.

Cover: A Source Book in Chemistry, 1900-1950

A Source Book in Chemistry, 1900-1950

Leicester, Henry M.

The Source Book serves as an introduction to present-day chemistry and can also be used as supplementary reading in general chemistry courses, since, in many instances, the papers explain the circumstances under which a particular discovery was made—information that is customarily lacking in textbooks. Although the selections are classified into the usual branches of the science, it will be apparent to the reader how the discoveries in any one branch were taken up and incorporated into others.

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